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We Are Not the Enemy: The Practice of Advocacy in Singapore - cover

We Are Not the Enemy: The Practice of Advocacy in Singapore

Cherian George, Kok Hoe Ng, Thirunalan Sasitharan, Carol Yuen, Daryl Yang, Haolie Jiang, Joel Yew, Remy Choo, Kirsten Han, Isaac Neo, Kristian-Marc James Paul, Alfian Sa'at, Walid Jumblatt Abdullah, Irie Aman, Reetaza Chatterjee, Kenneth Paul Tan, Corinna Lim, Alex Au, Suraendher Kumarr

Publisher: Ethos Books

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Summary

Advocates and activists in Singapore contribute to policy discussions and positive change through a combination of deft manoeuvres and patient politics. Yet civil society is often unacknowledged, their skill and labour instead frequently misunderstood, even earning them the label of “troublemakers” or “enemies of the state”. 
 
This collection of essays and interviews is a candid reflection on the intentions, beliefs and strategies behind the practice of advocacy across a spectrum of causes. The contributors come from varying backgrounds and include academics, artists, lawyers, journalists, non-profit and advocacy organisations, student and community organisers. They share practical insights into their aims and community-building work, and the tactics they employ to overcome obstacles, shedding light on how to navigate a city-state with shifting socio-political fault lines and out-of-bound markers. 
 
With an introduction, “It is Time to Trim the Banyan Tree”, by Constance Singam, and a conclusion, “Their Struggle is Ours to Continue”, by Suraendher Kumarr.
Available since: 03/17/2024.
Print length: 300 pages.

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