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The Brownies and Other Tales (Illustrated) - cover

The Brownies and Other Tales (Illustrated)

Juliana Horatia Ewing, Alice B. Woodward (Illustrator)

Publisher: BertaBooks

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Summary

A Illustrated collection of stories where children are being told many different incredible stories about amazing creatures and circumstances.

Juliana Ewing gives her readers a collection of charming 19th century stories suited for a relaxing afternoon of reading under a shade tree. Juliana Horatia Ewing was a 19th century writer of children's books. Her books were considered to be the first really well written books for children in English literature.

This book includes THE BROWNIES, THE LAND OF LOST TOYS, AN IDYLL OF THE WOOD, and AMELIA AND THE DWARFS.

The Brownies: A little girl sat sewing and crying on a garden seat. She had fair floating hair, which the breeze blew into her eyes, and between the cloud of hair, and the mist of tears, she could not see her work very clearly. She neither tied up her locks, nor dried her eyes, however; for when one is miserable, one may as well be completely so.
Available since: 08/05/2017.

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