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The Blind Pig - cover

The Blind Pig

Jon A. Jackson

Publisher: Grove Press

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Summary

A taut police thriller featuring detective “Fang” Mulheisen—from a writer hailed as “the best-kept secret of hard-boiled crime fiction connoisseurs” (The New York Times Book Review).   When a cop guns down an intruder during a break-in, it seems like another case of a bad guy meeting a bad end—until the owner of the garage being burgled is revealed to be Jerry Vanni, a young man whose trucking empire is branching out into juke boxes and vending machines.   Detroit’s Det. Sgt. “Fang” Mulheisen knows that Vanni’s businesses are normally controlled by the mob—and when a pair of gunmen walks into a bar and fills one of Vanni’s jukes with lead, Mulheisen is sure there’s more trouble on the way.   His investigation leads him into an ever-growing criminal enterprise involving gun-smuggling Cubans, a million-dollar heist, and a gorgeous woman mixed up with both. It’s the kind of trouble that can get a good cop killed . . .    “Few color the police procedural with such bluesy riffs—or make it jump—the way Jackson does.” —Detroit Free Press
Available since: 12/09/2014.
Print length: 304 pages.

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