Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Among Angels - Poems - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have 800,000 other books to choose from, so you can read without limits!

Among Angels - Poems

Jane Yolen, Nancy Willard

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

A magical, whimsical, and heart-soaring collection of angelic poetry from two award-winning literary masters Acclaimed novelist Nancy Willard and World Fantasy Award and Nebula Award–winning author and editor Jane Yolen collaborate on this magnificent anthology of their original poetry. For years the 2 friends and literary colleagues have shared a mutual fascination with God’s winged messengers and exchanged angel poems—some reverent, some witty, some sweet, some biting, and each one a miraculous invention. Now these wondrous flights of angelic fancy are gathered together in a singular collection of breathtaking verse.   Rooted in the Christian and Hebrew traditions, these brief, lyrical masterworks celebrate the heavenly beings that have flown through our collective imagination for centuries: Gabriel and the archangel Michael, the fallen Lucifer and the Angel of Death. In rich and sumptuous poetry, the authors muse on angels’ flight, feathers, faith, writing on pinheads, and the glory and inconvenience of having wings. To luxuriate in Yolen and Willard’s poetic words, ideas, and unforgettable images is to truly fly among angels.

Other books that might interest you

  • She Felt Like Feeling Nothing - cover

    She Felt Like Feeling Nothing

    r.h. Sin

    • 1
    • 27
    • 0
    There are moments when the heart no longer wishes to feel because everything it's felt up until then has brought it nothing but anguish. In She Felt Like Feeling Nothing, r.h. Sin pursues themes of self-discovery and retrospection. With this book, the poet intends to create a safe space where women can rest their weary hearts and focus on themselves.
    Show book
  • Tiger Country (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    Tiger Country (NHB Modern Plays)

    Nina Raine

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Nina Raine's Tiger Country is a hospital play that follows a tangle of doctors and nurses in a busy London hospital - from the award-winning author of Tribes.  
    Professionalism and prejudice, turbulent staff romances, ambition and failure collide in this swirling, action-packed drama about an overburdened health service that we all depend on and the dedicated individuals that keep it going.  
    'Tiger country' is where animal instinct stirs and an irrefutable eye opens. Where we make eye contact with the unknown.  
    Tiger Country was premiered at Hampstead Theatre in 2011 and, following its sell-out run, was revived there in 2014.  
    'a meticulously researched and totally absorbing work play' - Whatsonstage.com  
    'pacy, action-packed and, in places, touching. The sheer spectacle of the thing is so much more impressive than on the small screen' - Daily Mail  
    'a witty, highly intelligent, PC-scourging sensibility' - Independent
    Show book
  • Planting Gardens in Graves - cover

    Planting Gardens in Graves

    r.h. Sin

    • 3
    • 42
    • 0
    r.h. Sin returns with a force in Planting Gardens in Graves: a powerful collection of poetry that hones in on the themes dearest to his readers. This original volume celebrates connection, mourns heartbreak, and above all, empowers its readers to seek the love they deserve.
    Show book
  • The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - Illustrated - cover

    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner...

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is the longest major poem by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 
     
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner relates the experiences of a sailor who has returned from a long sea voyage. The mariner stops a man who is on the way to a wedding ceremony and begins to narrate a story. The wedding-guest's reaction turns from bemusement to impatience to fear to fascination as the mariner's story progresses, as can be seen in the language style: Coleridge uses narrative techniques such as personification and repetition to create a sense of danger or serenity, depending on the mood in different parts of the poem. 
     
    "The mariner's tale begins with his ship departing on its journey. Despite initial good fortune, the ship is driven south by a storm and eventually reaches Antarctic waters. An albatross appears and leads them out of the ice jam where they are stuck, but even as the albatross is praised by the ship's crew, the mariner shoots the bird. 
    
    The crew is angry with the mariner, believing the albatross brought the south wind that led them out of the Antarctic. However, the sailors change their minds when the weather becomes warmer and the mist disappears. 
    
    They soon find that they made a grave mistake in supporting this crime, as it arouses the wrath of spirits who then pursue the ship "from the land of mist and snow"; the south wind that had initially led them from the land of ice now sends the ship into uncharted waters near the equator, where it is becalmed." 
     
    The poem may have been inspired by James Cook's second voyage of exploration (1772–1775) of the South Seas and the Pacific Ocean; Coleridge's tutor, William Wales, was the astronomer on Cook's flagship and had a strong relationship with Cook. On this second voyage Cook crossed three times into the Antarctic Circle to determine whether the fabled great southern continent existed. Critics have also suggested that the poem may have been inspired by the voyage of Thomas James into the Arctic. "Some critics think that Coleridge drew upon James's account of hardship and lamentation in writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner."
    Show book
  • Edgar & Annabel (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    Edgar & Annabel (NHB Modern Plays)

    Sam Holcroft

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A young couple prepare dinner - but something isn't right. In a city not so different from our own capital, a group of freedom fighters attempts to stand up to an Orwellian establishment in increasingly perilous circumstances. The story that unfolds brings into question relationships, identities and the nature of reality itself'  
    'Holcroft plunges us into an Orwellian near-future dystopia, where governmental aural surveillance is rife and, for political dissenters, everyday life is a carefully maintained lie. It's as theatrically playful as it is disturbing' - The Times  
    'not just a drama of political resistance set in some parallel British dystopia, but also a cute sendup of theatre acting and writing... keeps us guessing throughout' - Guardian  
    'startlingly imaginative... Clever, funny and disturbing, it's a blend of conceptual prank and dystopian satire' - Evening Standard
    Show book
  • Women Power and Politics: Then (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    Women Power and Politics: Then...

    Marie Jones

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    A collection of wide-ranging and ambitious short plays reflecting the complexities of women and political power in the United Kingdom.  
    The four plays published here look back to the moments in history when women possessed - or achieved - power, and what they did with it.  
    The Milliner and the Weaver by Marie JonesHenrietta from Belfast and Elspeth from Dublin are unlikely comrades. The Suffragette movement binds them together, but as the question of Home Rule divides Ireland, will national politics tear them apart?  
    The Lioness by Rebecca LenkiewiczElizabeth I described herself as Queen, King and Prince, thriving in a male world, and saving the country from debt and wars. Self-proclaimed wife and mother to England, her virgin status was part of her myth, as she consistently refused marriage, citing herself as already taken. Here we see Elizabeth as both a woman and a leader as she encounters John Knox, the ultimate misogynist, and Essex, her favourite. Handbagged by Moira BuffiniFor over a decade Margaret Thatcher met the Queen for a weekly audience. With all her previous Prime Ministers the Queen enjoyed a fairly informal relationship, but with Mrs Thatcher, things were different. Handbagged speculates on the relationship between these two very powerful and private women.  
    Bloody Wimmin by Lucy KirkwoodThe protests at Greenham Common were a political landmark of the eighties. But how much did Greenham impact on the fight for nuclear disarmament, the progress of the women's movement and the culture of protest itself?
    Show book