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I Wrote This for You and Only You - cover

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I Wrote This for You and Only You

Iain S. Thomas

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

The follow-up to the international #1 bestselling collection of prose and photography, I Wrote This For You And Only You is the third book in the I Wrote This For You series and gathers together the very best entries in the project from 2011 to 2015. Started in 2007, I Wrote This For You is an internationally acclaimed exploration of hauntingly beautiful words, photography and emotion that's unique to each person that reads it.

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