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The Virgin of the Sun - cover

The Virgin of the Sun

H. Rider Haggard

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

In this swashbuckling tale of medieval adventure, an English fisherman lost at sea finds romance, intrigue, and war among the peoples of Peru.While exploring the jumble of curiosities at the home of an eccentric antiquarian, an editor discovers a collection of letters dating back to the era of King Richard II. These letters recount the incredible life story of one Hubert of Hastings, a fisherman turned London goldsmith whose turbulent fortunes brought him to a strange new land that would become his home. Shortly after a whirlwind wedding, Hubert finds himself both widowed and framed for murder. Together with his old friend Kari, he escapes by ship, only to be storm-tossed across the Atlantic. Undertaking a voyage to Kari’s homeland along the Pacific coast, they hope to finally find peace. Instead they find a brewing war between the Chancas and the Incas, and Hubert finds an unattainable love that could change the course of history.
Available since: 10/18/2022.
Print length: 349 pages.

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