Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Treasure of the Lake - cover

The Treasure of the Lake

H. Rider Haggard

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Gentleman adventurer Allan Quartermain discovers a strange African village in this 1926 novel by the author of King Solomon’s Mines.An Englishman living in South Africa, Allan Quartermain has spent his life exploring the mysteries of the Dark Continent. When he hears the legend of a lost tribe ruled by a magical priestess, he goes in search of a remote holy lake surrounded by tall cliffs. Together with his companion Hans, Allan discovers a land and a people even more peculiar than the legend describes. Published posthumously in 1926, The Treasure of the Lake is one of the last Allan Quartermain novels written by H. Rider Haggard. Set in the Victorian era, it is a quintessential tale of colonial adventure.

Other books that might interest you

  • Forsyte Saga The Volume 3 - To Let - cover

    Forsyte Saga The Volume 3 - To Let

    John Galsworthy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The house at Richmond is finished at last, but Soames takes Bosinney to court for exceeding the budget. The final judgment of their case turns on ‘a very fine point’ in their correspondence.The architect does not heed Young Jolyon’s warning and continues to pursue Irene - with fatal consequences.Old Jolyon effects a complete reconciliation with his son and changes his will as a result, further distancing himself from his brother James in the process. The rift will continue through into the next generation.The old man purchases Robin Hill and spends the remaining days of his life in the company of Irene, now teaching music and ‘assisting the Magdelenes of London’. This charming interlude brings Galsworthy’s Book 1 of the Saga to a close.Public Domain (P)2010 Assembled Stories
    Show book
  • Who killed Charlie Winpole? - cover

    Who killed Charlie Winpole?

    Ernest Bramah

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Ernest Bramah (1868-1942) was an English author of 21 novels and numerous short stories and features. His humorous works have been ranked with Jerome K. Jerome and W. W. Jacobs, his detective stories with Conan Doyle, his politico-science fiction with H. G. Wells, and his supernatural stories with Algernon Blackwood.In his stories of detection, Bramah hit on the idea of a blind detective, Max Carrados, whose triumphs are all the more amazing because of his disability.In Who Killed Charlie Winpole?, Max Carrados investigates what initially appears to be a tragic case of a teenage boy who is accidentally poisoned by a toxic toadstool mistaken for an edible mushroom. Within a few days, the boy's uncle has been arrested and charged with murder. But Carrados is not satisfied by this explanation either and embarks on a highly irregular kind of investigation.
    Show book
  • Hop-Frog - cover

    Hop-Frog

    Edgar Allan Poe

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "Hop-Frog or the Eight Chained Orangutans" is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. The title character, a person with dwarfism taken from his homeland, becomes the jester of a king particularly fond of practical jokes. Taking revenge on the king and his cabinet for the king's striking his friend and fellow dwarf Trippetta, he dresses the king and his cabinet as orangutans for a masquerade. In front of the king's guests, Hop-Frog murders them all by setting their costumes on fire before escaping with Trippetta. 
    Critical analysis has suggested that Poe wrote the story as a form of literary revenge against a woman named Elizabeth F. Ellet and her circle.
    Show book
  • Utopia - cover

    Utopia

    Thomas Moore

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The classic political satire about an imaginary ideal world by one of the Renaissance’s most fascinating figures.Named after a word that translates literally to “nowhere,” Utopia is an island dreamed up by Thomas More, a devout Catholic, English statesman, and Renaissance humanist who would be canonized as a saint centuries after he was executed for choosing God over king. More’s novel introduces us to Utopia’s society and its customs. It is a place of no private property and no lawyers; of six-hour workdays and simple ways; and, intriguingly, of a combination of values that blend the traditional with the highly controversial, from euthanasia to married priests to slavery. Remarkably thought-provoking, it is a novel that asks us to question what makes a perfect world—and whether such a thing is even possible.
    Show book
  • The Jungle - cover

    The Jungle

    Upton Sinclair

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In this powerful book, we enter the world of Jurgis Rudkus, a young Lithuanian immigrant who arrives in America fired with dreams of wealth, freedom, and opportunity. And we discover the astonishing truth about "packingtown," the busy, flourishing, filthy Chicago stockyards, where New World visions perish in a jungle of human suffering. Upton Sinclair, master of the "muckraking" novel, here explores the workingman's lot at the turn of the century: the backbreaking labor, the injustices of "wage slavery," and the bewildering chaos of urban life. The Jungle, a story so shocking that it launched a government investigation, re-creates this startling chapter of our history in unflinching detail. Always a vigorous champion of political reform, Sinclair is also a gripping storyteller, and his 1906 novel stands as one of the most important-and moving-works in the literature of social change.
    Show book
  • Billy Budd - cover

    Billy Budd

    Herman Melville

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A young sailor in the eighteenth-century Royal Navy is falsely accused of mutiny in this classic tale of good and evil by the celebrated author of Moby Dick.England, 1797. Billy Budd, a young sailor aboard the merchant ship Rights-of-Man is conscripted to serve on a Royal Navy warship, the HMS Bellipotent. Innocent and charming despite his stutter, Billy is quickly accepted by the crew—and resented by the ship’s brooding master-at-arms, John Claggart. When Claggart accuses Billy of conspiracy to mutiny, the false charge sets the young innocent on an inescapable path toward tragedy. Herman Melville’s final novel, Billy Budd was first published in 1924, more than thirty years after the author’s death. A tale of virtue caught in the machinery of law and wartime vigilance, this American classic has been adapted for both stage and screen, and remains one of Melville’s most beloved works.
    Show book