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Mystery Tribune Issue Nº8 - Winter 2019 - cover

Mystery Tribune Issue Nº8 - Winter 2019

SJ Rozan, Hilary Davidson, Ryan David Jahn, Kevin Roller, Hester Young, William Soldan, Gary Earl Ross, Nick Kolakowski, Erica Wright, Jonathan Ferrini

Publisher: Mystery Tribune

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Summary

The second anniversary issue of a mystery magazine which Bestselling author Reed Farrel Coleman has called “a cut above” and mystery grand masters Lawrence Block and Max Allan Collins have praised for its “solid fiction” and “the most elegant design”.
 
Our Issue Nº8: Winter 2019 features
 
A curated collection of short fiction including stories by Hester Young, Edgar Award Winner SJ Rozan, Hilary Davidson, Ryan David Jahn, Edgar Award Winner Gary Earl Ross, Jonathan Ferrini, Kevin R. Roller, and William R. Soldan.
 
Interviews and Reviews by Charlaine Harris, Charles Perry and Nick Kolakowski.
 
Art and Photography by Brittany Markert, Anka Zhuravleva and more.
 
This issue also features a preview of the new The Wrath Of Fantomas graphic novel by Olivier Bocquet and Julie Rocheleau.
 
An elegantly crafted quarterly issue, printed on uncoated paper and with a beautiful layout designed for optimal reading experience, our Winter 2019 issue will make a perfect companion or gift for avid mystery readers and fans of literary crime fiction.

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