Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
7 best short stories by Ellis Parker Butler - cover

7 best short stories by Ellis Parker Butler

Ellis Parker Butler, August Nemo

Publisher: Tacet Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Ellis Parker Butler was the author of more than 30 books and more than 2,000 stories and essays and is most famous for his short story "Pigs Is Pigs", in which a bureaucratic stationmaster insists on levying the livestock rate for a shipment of two pet guinea pigs, which soon start proliferating exponentially. His most famous character was Philo Gubb. Despite the enormous volume of his work, Butler was, for most of his life, only a part-time author. He worked full-time as a banker and was very active in his local community. A founding member of both the Dutch Treat Club and the Authors League of America, Butler was an always-present force in the New York City literary scene.
In this book you will find seven short stories specially selected by the critic August Nemo:

- Pigs is Pigs
- The Hard-boiled Egg
- Philo Gubb's Greatest Case
- Solander's Radio Tomb
- The Thin Santa Claus
- Dey Ain't No Ghosts
- The Man Who Did Not Go to Heaven on Tuesday

Other books that might interest you

  • Fashionably Late - cover

    Fashionably Late

    Olivia Goldsmith

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A clothes designer tries to coordinate her out-of-control life, in a novel from the New York Times–bestselling author that’s “juicy good fun” (Newsday).   All of Karen Kahn’s dreams seem to be coming true. She’s been honored with the fashion industry’s most coveted award, her marriage is thriving, and some very impressive money is being dangled in front of her in a proposed buyout. The only thing missing is what she craves most—a baby. When she receives the heartbreaking news that she’ll never be able to have a child, it feels like the doctor’s verdict has pulled a loose thread—and suddenly everything seems to be unraveling. Now she has to take a hard look at her life and figure out what really suits her and what doesn’t . . .   “This new novel by the author of The First Wives Club works at every level. An engaging, behind-the-scenes look at the fashion industry, it lays bare the frenetic pace, cutthroat competition and chronic backbiting of the world of couture. Also an engrossing family saga, it shows 40-year-old Karen, who is infertile, desperately trying to adopt a baby and, as an adopted child herself, searching for her birth mother. The narrative also offers a hilariously dark portrait of Karen’s immediate—and totally dysfunctional—family. A glittering New York social backdrop, plenty of namedropping, romance, some outstandingly creative characters . . . A book that fairly hums with excitement.” —Publishers Weekly  
    Show book
  • The Intrusion of Jimmy - cover

    The Intrusion of Jimmy

    P. G. Wodehouse

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The action begins with playboy bachelor Jimmy Pitt in New York; having fallen in love on a transatlantic liner, he befriends a small-time burglar and breaks into a police captain's house as a result of a bet. The cast of characters head to England, and from there on it is a typically Wodehousian romantic farce, set at the stately Dreever Castle, overflowing with imposters, detectives, crooks, scheming lovers and conniving aunts.(from Wikipedia)
    Show book
  • Female Ruins - A Novel - cover

    Female Ruins - A Novel

    Geoff Nicholson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “An elegantly constructed and often funny story about a man, a woman and . . . ‘the greatest modern English architect never to have built a building’” (The New York Times Book Review).   Geoff Nicholson’s novel tells the story of Christopher Howell, a cult architect who allegedly built just one building, and the search for that fabled building―reputedly a wild, willful amalgam of styles ranging from eleventh-century Norman to twentieth-century Neutra. Ingeniously built into the narrative are bits of Howell’s essays that celebrate the idea of the “Cardboard House” and the architecture of impermanence. When Howell’s daughter—and keeper of his flame—Kelly, and a Howell groupie named Jack Dexter hook up in a free-falling love affair, the search for this apocryphal building becomes a search for a lost past. Brilliantly funny and seriously obsessive, Female Ruins shows how the castles we build are often symbols of our own needs, follies, and magnificent obsessions.   “A meditative tale of a physical and psychological homecoming that builds its quiet and riveting plot through the dreams, achievements and theories of a dead architect with a mysterious legacy. . . . Nicholson eschews the sarcastic bite of his earlier books (such as Whitbread-nominee Bleeding London), unraveling a complex, subtle story with equally intricate and modulated characters. This restraint, which artfully leads the reader to the poignant yet satisfying denouement, gives the novel special appeal.” —Publishers Weekly   “With his two protagonists, Nicholson has created believably flawed human beings, and if they sometimes come off as mouthpieces for architectural theory, it is a forgivable sin in an otherwise enjoyable novel.” —Booklist
    Show book
  • Dangerous - cover

    Dangerous

    Bill Hicks

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    On his hilarious first album Hicks unleashes his thoughts on homelessness, smoking, drugs, and porn. While it may seem dark and cynical, it’s sunny compared to the work that follows.
    Show book
  • Mother Goose for Grownups - cover

    Mother Goose for Grownups

    Guy Wetmore Carryl

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Mother Goose for Grownups is a delightfully silly collection of parodies on well-known Mother Goose tales by Guy Wetmore Carryl. (Summary by fink)
    Show book
  • Just Stories: The Kind That Never Grow Old - cover

    Just Stories: The Kind That...

    Winfrid Herbst

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Good Books are wise counselors. They point out the right way in the devious paths of life. Have we not often stood at the juncture of two roads, the one of righteousness and the other of unfaithfulness, and was it not then that some golden little book acted the part of an opportune adviser and directed us down the highway of truth? Is there one of us who can truthfully say that good books have not been his loyal and trustworthy helpers, his vigilant guardians in life's intricate ways? This unpretentious little book of goodness stories, a companion volume to "Tell Us Another," must speak for itself.This is a charming volume of short stories for Catholic children. In it are 48 stories designed to teach morals and the truths of the faith. (Summary from the introduction to the book and Maria Therese)
    Show book