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Wasted Time - cover

Wasted Time

Edward Hertrich

Publisher: Dundurn

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Summary

A stark and honest memoir of thirty-five years spent in Canada’s prison system. 
 


Born and raised in Toronto’s Regent Park, Edward Hertrich left high school in grade eleven to start working. A year later, he started dealing drugs in earnest, beginning a criminal career that resulted in him being incarcerated for thirty-five of his next forty years.  
 


In Wasted Time, Hertrich describes his time behind bars. Once considered a serious threat to public safety, he spent much of his time at Millhaven Institution, a maximum-security prison that housed four hundred of Canada’s most dangerous inmates, including murderers, bank robbers, and gang members, as well as — for most of his stay there — a gang of sadistic guards.

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