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A fekete kísértet - The Black Abbott - cover

A fekete kísértet - The Black Abbott

Edgar Wallace

Publisher: Fapadoskonyv.hu Kiadó

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Summary

They say the ghost of the Black Abbot has been seen near the old abbey, and Cartwright the grocer claims to have seen it too. Meanwhile Harry Alford, eighteenth Earl of Chelford is engaged to Leslie Gine, sister of Arthur, solicitor and gambler with the f

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