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At the Earth's Core - cover

At the Earth's Core

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

Two men uncover a savage Stone Age society underground in this classic fantasy adventure by the author of Tarzan of the Apes and John Carter of Mars.The Iron Mole is a giant machine meant to excavate for mineral deposits. Instead, it takes David Innes, a wealthy mining heir, and Abner Perry, a genius inventor, five hundred miles down through the Earth’s crust to a world unlike any they’ve ever seen.In the land of Pellucidar, the Earth’s fiery core functions as the sun, providing eternal daylight. Prehistoric monsters roam through lush jungles. Deadly flying reptiles called Mahars enslave ape-like servants and primitive humans. And escape could cost you your life . . . First published in 1914 as a serial, At the Earth’s Core was the first of seven Edgar Rice Burroughs novels set in the fantastical subterranean world of Pellucidar.
Available since: 10/04/2022.
Print length: 187 pages.

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