Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Gothic Classics: 60+ Books in One Volume - A Journey Through Terror Romance and the Supernatural - cover

Gothic Classics: 60+ Books in One Volume - A Journey Through Terror Romance and the Supernatural

Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Allan Poe, William Hope Hodgson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, Anna Katharine Green, George MacDonald, Bram Stoker, Charlotte Brontë, Emily Bronte, William Godwin, Henry James, Victor Hugo, Théophile Gautier, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Austen, John Meade Falkner, George Eliot, Robert Hugh Benson, Horace Walpole, Frederick Marryat, Thomas Love Peacock, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Gaston Leroux, Grant Allen, ARTHUR MACHEN, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Peckett Prest, James Malcolm Rymer, Charles Brockden Brown, James Hogg, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Richard Marsh, Charles Robert Maturin, John William Polidori, H. G. Wells, W.W. Jacobs, H. P. Lovecraft, William Thomas Beckford, Nikolai Gogol, Mary Shelley, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Gregory Lewis, Fitz-James O'Brien, Eliza Parsons

Translator C.J. Hogarth, Samuel Henley, Isabel F. Hapgood

Publisher: Good Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Gothic Classics: 60+ Books in One Volume presents an unparalleled collection that traces the development and transformations of the Gothic genre across centuries and continents. Encompassing a broad spectrum of literary stylesfrom the foreboding ruins and landscapes of the 18th century to the psychological hauntings of the 19th and early 20th centuriesthis anthology highlights the thematic richness and diversity of Gothic literature. The works included offer readers a unique journey through terror, romance, and the supernatural, showcasing the evolution of the genre and including standout pieces that have influenced the shape of horror and speculative fiction as we know it today. The contributing authors and editors, a veritable who's who of literary giants such as Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Mary Shelley, bring together a mosaic of backgrounds, perspectives, and voices. These creators, many of whom were at the forefront of the Romantic, Victorian, and early modernist movements, offer a multi-faceted exploration of Gothic themes. Their collective oeuvre, reflective of the societal anxieties and fascinations of their times, enriches this anthology by presenting varied narratives that challenge the boundaries between the mortal and the spectral, the oppressor and the oppressed. Gothic Classics: 60+ Books in One Volume is an indispensable addition for students, scholars, and aficionados of the Gothic. This anthology invites readers into a labyrinth of haunted estates, forbidden desires, and ineffable mysteries, offering a comprehensive compendium that spans over two centuries of literary achievement. Through its pages, one discovers not only the depths of human imagination but also the enduring allure of the Gothic story, making it a perfect resource for those seeking to immerse themselves in the shadows and subtleties of Gothic literature's rich legacy.
Available since: 12/14/2023.
Print length: 10814 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Arizona Nights - Booktrack Edition - cover

    Arizona Nights - Booktrack Edition

    Stewart Edward White

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Listen to Arizona Nights with a movie-style soundtrack and amplify your audiobook experience. 
    A series of stories loosely connected by the narrative device of different speakers swapping yarns around the campfire at the end of each trail-riding day."A series of spirited tales emphasizing some phase of the life of the ranch, plains and desert, and all, taken together, forming a single sharply-cut picture of life in the far Southwest. All the tonic of the West is in this masterpiece of Stewart
    Show book
  • The Fire of London - cover

    The Fire of London

    Arnold Bennett

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    'The Fire of London' is an unusual mystery story about a case of fraud and blackmail. Bruce Bowring, a businessman of dubious integrity, has been running what amounts to a Ponzi scheme in the heart of the city of London. At the start of our story, Bowring receives a mysterious telephone call from a stranger, warning him that his house will be burgled that evening.  
    Shortly afterwards, a telegram arrives, signed by his wife, suggesting they dine out, as their cook is drunk. As Bowring sets off for the rendezvous with his wife, he has no inkling of the strange series of adventures which await him.
    Show book
  • Peer Gynt - cover

    Peer Gynt

    Henrik Ibsen

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Peer Gynt is a five-act play written by Henrik Ibsen, a renowned Norwegian playwright. First published in 1867, it tells the adventurous and introspective journey of the title character, Peer Gynt. The play follows Peer's exploits, starting from his youthful escapades in a small Norwegian village to his encounters with trolls, a seductive woman named Solveig, and various characters he meets along the way. Peer Gynt is known for its vivid imagery, symbolic language, and exploration of themes such as identity, self-discovery, and the nature of human existence. 
     
    At the heart of Peer Gynt is the character of Peer himself, a complex and multi-faceted individual. He is portrayed as a dreamer and a wanderer, constantly seeking meaning and purpose in life. Peer's journey is marked by his encounters with different aspects of himself and society, allowing the audience to reflect on the nature of human behavior and the consequences of one's actions. The play challenges conventional ideas of morality and societal norms, presenting Peer as a character who moves between selfishness and selflessness, illusion and reality, and ultimately learns the importance of personal responsibility and authenticity. 
     
    One of the notable aspects of Peer Gynt is its use of fantasy and folklore elements, particularly in Peer's encounters with trolls and other mythical creatures. These episodes provide a surreal and symbolic backdrop for Peer's psychological and spiritual journey. Through these encounters, Ibsen delves into themes of illusion versus reality, the human capacity for self-deception, and the consequences of chasing after superficial desires. The play also incorporates elements of Norwegian culture and folklore, adding a distinct national flavor to the story.
    Show book
  • Adventures of Sherlock Holmes The (Unabridged) - cover

    Adventures of Sherlock Holmes...

    Arthur Conan Doyle

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES is a collection of twelve short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. It was first published on 14 October 1892, though the individual stories had been serialised in The Strand Magazine between June 1891 and July 1892. The stories are not in chronological order, and the only characters common to all twelve are Holmes and Dr. Watson. As with all but four of the Sherlock Holmes stories, those contained within The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes are told by a first-person narrative from the point of view of Dr. Watson. In general, the stories in THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES identify, and try to correct, social injustices. Holmes is portrayed as offering a new, fairer sense of justice. The stories were well received, and boosted the subscriptions figures of The Strand Magazine, prompting Doyle to be able to demand more money for his next set of stories. The first story, 'A Scandal in Bohemia', includes the character of Irene Adler, who, despite being featured only within this one story by Doyle, is a prominent character in modern Sherlock Holmes adaptations, generally as a love interest for Holmes. Doyle included four of the twelve stories from this collection in his twelve favourite Sherlock Holmes stories, picking 'The Adventure of the Speckled Band' as his overall favourite.
    Show book
  • They - cover

    They

    Rudyard Kipling

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A haunting tale of ghosts presented by Renegade Arts Entertainment.
    Show book
  • The Lost World - cover

    The Lost World

    Arthur Conan Doyle

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "The Lost World" is a novel written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the British author best known for creating the iconic detective Sherlock Holmes. Published in 1912, this adventure novel stands apart from Doyle's more famous detective fiction and is known for its exploration of the unknown and its contribution to the "lost world" literary genre. 
     
    The story is centered around the character of Professor Challenger, an eccentric and larger-than-life scientist who, like Sherlock Holmes, became one of Conan Doyle's memorable literary creations. Professor Challenger claims to have discovered evidence of prehistoric life in the Amazon rainforest and invites a group of individuals, including the narrator Edward Malone, to join him on an expedition to verify his findings. 
     
    The group embarks on a perilous journey into the uncharted and remote plateau in South America, where they encounter a world seemingly frozen in time. Dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures roam the plateau, and the explorers must navigate not only the dangers of the natural world but also the challenges of their own personalities and relationships. 
     
    "The Lost World" is a pioneering work in the "lost world" subgenre of adventure fiction, which involves the discovery of isolated and prehistoric environments that time forgot. It predates other famous works in this genre, such as Edgar Rice Burroughs' "The Land That Time Forgot" and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's contemporary H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine." 
     
    The novel combines elements of science fiction, adventure, and exploration with themes of human curiosity, bravery, and the clash between the modern world and the primeval past. It also touches on the ethical implications of encountering and documenting creatures thought to be extinct.
    Show book