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100 Books You Must Read Before You Die - volume 2 [newly updated] [Ulysses; Dangerous Liaisons; Of Human Bondage; Moby-Dick; The Jungle; Anna Karenina; etc] (Book House Publishing) - cover

100 Books You Must Read Before You Die - volume 2 [newly updated] [Ulysses; Dangerous Liaisons; Of Human Bondage; Moby-Dick; The Jungle; Anna Karenina; etc] (Book House Publishing)

Edgar Allan Poe, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, D. H. Lawrence, Lev Tolstói, William Somerset Maugham, Sinclair Lewis, Joe Joyce, Thomas Mann, Rabindranath Tagore, Upton Sinclair, H. G. Wells

Publisher: Book House Publishing

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Summary

This book, newly updated, contains now several HTML tables of contents that will make reading a real pleasure!
The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work.

This 2nd volume contains the following 50 works, arranged alphabetically by authors’ last names:

Jerome, Jerome K.: Three Men in a Boat
Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Joyce, James: Ulysses
Kingsley, Charles: The Water-Babies
Kipling, Rudyard: Kim
La Fayette, Madame de: The Princess of Clèves
Laclos, Pierre Choderlos de: Dangerous Liaisons
Lawrence, D. H.: Sons and Lovers
Lawrence, D. H.: The Rainbow
Le Fanu, Sheridan: In a Glass Darkly
Lewis, Matthew Gregory: The Monk
Lewis, Sinclair: Main Street
London, Jack: The Call of the Wild
Lovecraft, H.P.: At the Mountains of Madness
Mann, Thomas: Royal Highness
Maugham, William Somerset: Of Human Bondage
Maupassant, Guy de: Bel-Ami
Melville, Herman: Moby-Dick
Poe, Edgar Allan: The Fall of the House of Usher
Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way
Radcliffe, Ann: The Mysteries of Udolpho
Richardson, Samuel: Clarissa
Sand, George: The Devil’s Pool
Scott, Walter: Ivanhoe
Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein
Sienkiewicz, Henryk: Quo Vadis
Sinclair, May: Life and Death of Harriett Frean
Sinclair, Upton: The Jungle
Stendhal: The Red and the Black
Stendhal: The Chartreuse of Parma
Sterne, Laurence: Tristram Shandy
Stevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure Island
Stoker, Bram: Dracula
Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels
Tagore, Rabindranath: The Home and the World
Thackeray, William Makepeace: Vanity Fair
Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace
Tolstoy, Leo: Anna Karenina
Trollope, Anthony: The Way We Live Now
Turgenev, Ivan: Fathers and Sons
Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Verne, Jules: Journey to the Center of the Earth
Wallace, Lew: Ben-Hur
Wells, H. G.: The Time Machine
West, Rebecca: The Return of the Soldier
Wharton, Edith: The Age of Innocence
Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray
Xueqin, Cao: The Dream of the Red Chamber
Zola, Émile: Germinal

In the 1st volume of 100 Books You Must Read Before You Die you will find the remaining 50 works.

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