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The Lost Girl in Paris - cover

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The Lost Girl in Paris

Diney Costeloe

Publisher: Head of Zeus

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Summary

Paris, 1871. A lost child. A family divided. The bitter backdrop of war. A heart-stopping and gripping tale of endurance for fans of historical fiction. 
 
The St Clair family have returned home after the war, seeking refuge in Paris. But their safety is not to last. 
 
Their young daughter, Hélène, falls ill and, in an unlucky twist of fate, is separated from her family. Alone and afraid, she is left to fend for herself on the streets, until she is found by a group of violent revolutionaries... 
 
All the while, her brothers Georges and Marcel find themselves fighting on opposite sides of the barricade, and the family is swept up in the ever-rising tide of violence that sweeps the city's streets. Will they be able to take back their old lives? Will the brothers learn to overcome their differences and fight together? And will poor lost Hélène ever find her way home? 
 
Drawing on the author's own family history, The Lost Girl in Paris is an unforgettable story of resilience in the face of great fear. Readers are loving it: 
 
'Another brilliant book from Diney!' Amazon reviewer, 5*. 
 
'I look forward to Diney's next book, always a good read!' Amazon reviewer, 5*. 
 
'Brilliant book, can't wait for the next one!' Amazon reviewer, 5*. 
 
'Another great story from one of my favourite authors!' Amazon reviewer, 5*.

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