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The Women In The Black Dress - cover

The Women In The Black Dress

DeAndre' West

Publisher: DeAndre' West

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Summary

  
-Dalia Diaz has suffered from Split Personality Disorder since she was a child. Her parents were overwhelmed and forced to do the unthinkable.  Follow Dalia as she and her other personality seek revenge on everyone who had a hand in her horrible childhood!

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