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I Am Her Tribe - cover

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I Am Her Tribe

Danielle Doby

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Positive and powerful, I Am Her Tribe is a collection of poetry drawing on the viral Instagram handle and online hashtag that serves to create moments of connection through empowerment and storytelling. Focusing on inspiration, Doby's poetry invites its reader to "Come as you are. Your tribe has arrived.  Your breath can rest here."both soft and fiercecan coexist and still be powerful

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