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Mornings In Mexico - “I love trying things and discovering how I hate them” - cover

Mornings In Mexico - “I love trying things and discovering how I hate them”

D. H. Lawrence

Publisher: Lawrence Publishing

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Summary

For many of us DH Lawrence was a schoolboy hero. Who can forget sniggering in class at the mention of ‘Women In Love’ or ‘Lady Chatterley’s Lover’?   Lawrence was a talented if nomadic writer whose novels were passionately received, suppressed at times and generally at odds with Establishment values.  This of course did not deter him.   At his death in 1930 at the young age of 44 he was more often thought of as a pornographer but in the ensuing years he has come to be more rightly regarded as one of the most imaginative writers these shores have produced. As well as his novels he was also a masterful poet (he wrote over 800 of them), a travel writer as well as an author of many classic short stories.  Here we publish his travel writings ‘Mornings in Mexico’. Once again Lawrence shows his hand as a brilliant writer. Delving into the landscapes and peeling them back to reveal the inner heart.

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