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3 Stories in French for Kids - Read Aloud and Bedtime Stories for Children - cover

3 Stories in French for Kids - Read Aloud and Bedtime Stories for Children

Christian Stahl

Publisher: Publishdrive

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Summary

Improve your child's language skills in both French and English with this collection of 3 bedtime stories suitable for children 4 to 11 years old.
 
What you get with 3 Stories in French for Kids:
 
3 humorous and cultural relevant stories with life-learning values for children 4 - 11.
 
o   All the French stories are followed by English parallel text. 
 
o   The stories are designed to help your child learn both French and English.
 
o   The stories are also written for enjoyment and are perfect to read aloud to children 4+
 
o   This book is perfect for bedtime stories and short plays with children.
 
With the right blend of fantasy and funny children stories, parents as well as kids are assured to have a good bedtime.
 
For lovers of fantasy tales of all ages: Good stories know no age limit! Whether you a language learner looking for reading materials, or an adult who loves magical stories, this book will be a pleasure to read! (French Childrens Books ages 0 to 3 and French Childrens Books 6 to 8 Bilingual English French Childrens Books by Midealuck Publishing)
 
Help your young children to get started with French in a way that will fully capture their imagination and attention, start making bedtime more fun tonight with these humorous and captivating short stories! Never hesitate when it comes to helping a child, get your copy now!
Available since: 10/17/2022.
Print length: 24 pages.

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