Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Absolute Madness - A True Story of a Serial Killer Race and a City Divided - cover

Absolute Madness - A True Story of a Serial Killer Race and a City Divided

Catherine Pelonero

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Absolute Madness tells the disturbing true story of Joseph Christopher, a white serial killer who targeted black males and struck fear into the residents of New York in the 1980s. Dubbed both the 22-Caliber Killer and the Midtown Slasher, Christopher allegedly claimed eighteen victims during a savage four-month spree across the state. The investigation, aided by famed FBI profiler John Douglas, drew national attention and biting criticism from Jesse Jackson and other civil rights leaders. The killer, when at last he was unmasked, seemed an unlikely candidate to have held New York in a grip of terror. His capture was neither the end of the story nor the end of the racial strife, which flared anew during circuitous prosecutions and judicial rulings that prompted cries of a double standard in the justice system. Both a wrenching true crime story and an incisive portrait of dangerously discordant race relations in America, Absolute Madness also chronicles a lonely, vulnerable man’s tragic descent into madness and the failure of the American mental health system that refused his pleas for help.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Meaning of Flowers - Myth Language & Lore - cover

    The Meaning of Flowers - Myth...

    Ann Field, Gretchen Scoble

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    Should you send a rose of crimson or of white to the one you love? What gift of flowers best expresses thanks to a dear friend? From ancient days, long before words complicated what we say to one another, flowers have been our messengers, invested with our most cherished feelings. Illustrated with luscious collages by acclaimed artist Ann Field, this enchanting tribute to the power and symbolism of flowers offers a contemporary introduction to an age-old tradition. The text draws on botanical, historical, and mythological sources worldwide, from ancient Rome to Victorian England, from Asia to the Americas, presenting portraits of almost 50 blossoms favored for all time. In Persia, for instance, the black medulla of the red tulip was said to represent the lover's heart, burnt to a coal by love's passion. To Victorians, lavender signified a broken trust, hollyhocks fertility, and nasturtiums a jest or whimsy. Blending fact, folktale, natural history, and original art, The Meaning of Flowers explores the language and lore of nature's most intimate and beautiful gifts.
    Show book
  • Elizabeth Is Missing - One of the Eighteenth Century's Greatest Mysteries—Solved! - cover

    Elizabeth Is Missing - One of...

    Lillian de la Torre

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    The true story of the eighteenth-century English maidservant at the center of a fascinating criminal mystery. On New Year’s Day, 1753, Elizabeth Canning disappeared. An eighteen-year-old girl, she was unremarkable in every respect, from her appearance to her disposition, but she was about to become the most famous person in London. When she reappeared one month later, starving and ill, she claimed she had been abducted and held captive by a woman named Susannah Wells, who wanted Elizabeth to work for her as a prostitute. Based on Elizabeth’s testimony, Wells was arrested, tried, and convicted—but the case was just getting started.   Convinced the young woman was lying, the Lord Mayor of London set out to uncover the truth. What followed was one of the most celebrated criminal cases of the era. The controversy, which threatened to tear London apart, revolved around one frightened, mysterious girl.   Meticulously researched and irresistibly readable, Elizabeth Is Missing is the definitive account of one of the most unusual cases of the eighteenth century, a must-read for fans of historical true crime.  
    Show book
  • Psychotic States in Children - cover

    Psychotic States in Children

    Helene Dubinsky, Maria Rhode,...

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Developments in the understanding and psychotherapeutic treatment of children and adolescents suffering from psychotic levels of disturbance are dealt with in this work, from the Tavistock Clinic Series. The book is chiefly concerned with children troubled in their behaviour, relationships, and communication.There is something extremely unsettling about the disturbed behaviour of sexually abused and severely troubled children. In spite of a sometimes exasperating measure of perversion and destructive wilfulness, these children manage to communicate a clear plea for help - a plea which deeply affects those in their immediate surroundings who find themselves struggling to make sense of these contradictory messages. This book describes significant new developments in the understanding and treatment of children and adolescents suffering from psychotic levels of disturbance.Each chapter contains a clinical description of a child emerging from a psychotic state, creating a useful collection of case histories. Part One concerns sexually abused children, Part Two discusses psychotic children with severe developmental delay, and Part Three describes the treatment of children whose difficulties have both internal and external roots. Each part is followed by an authoritative critical commentary. A glossary of terms is included at the end of the book.
    Show book
  • The Borgias - cover

    The Borgias

    Alexandre Dumas

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Sorry, we have no synopsis for this book right now. Sign in to read it on 24symbols.com
    Show book
  • Twelve Years a Slave - Narrative of Solomon Northup a Citizen of New-York Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841 and Rescued in 1853 - cover

    Twelve Years a Slave - Narrative...

    Solomon Northup

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    After living as a free man for the first thirty-three years of his life, Solomon Northup was drugged, kidnapped, and sold into slavery, leaving behind a wife and three children in New York. Sold to a Louisiana plantation owner who was also a Baptist preacher, Northup proceeded to serve several masters, some who were brutally cruel and others whose humanity he praised. After years of bondage, he met an outspoken abolitionist from Canada who notified Northup's family of his whereabouts, and he was subsequently rescued by an official agent of the state of New York. Twelve Years a Slave is his account of this unusual series of events. Northup describes life on cotton and sugar cane plantations in meticulous detail. One slave narrative scholar calls his narrative "one of the most detailed and realistic portraits of slave life." He also leavens his account with wry humor and cultural commentary, making many parts of the narrative  read more like travel writing than abolitionist literature. Twelve Years a Slave presents the remarkable story of a free man thrown into a hostile and foreign world, who survived by his courage and cunning. 
     
    A DOCSOUTH BOOK. This collaboration between UNC Press and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library brings classic works back into print. DocSouth Books editions are selected from the digital library of Documenting the American South and are unaltered from the original publication. The DocSouth series uses digital technology to offer e-books and print-on-demand publications, providing affordable and accessible editions to a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers.
    Show book
  • Something Fresh - The Original Classic Edition - cover

    Something Fresh - The Original...

    P. G. Wodehouse

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In P.G. Wodehouse (Thames and Hudson Literary Lives Series), James Connolly offers this advice: Relax and reread Wodehouse; hes the boy to restore a sense of proportion. Absolutely good advice. I find rereading Wodehouse is more enjoyable than most first reads of other authors, and hes quite easy to reread, even if you dont intend to, because his stories appear in various collections and his novels were often published under various titles.
    
    Something Fresh, officially the first book in the Blandings Castle saga, was published as Something New as a serial in The Saturday Evening Post in 1915, and then as a book with the same title in an American edition. Something Fresh is a slightly altered British edition of that book. Ashe Marson, the unknown author of the hard-boiled Gridley Quayle, Investigator series of paperback pulps, answers an ad: WANTED--Young Man of Good Appearance, who is poor and reckless, to undertake delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. Poor and reckless is a formula in Wodehouse for a good-hearted, down on his luck guy, about to be smiled upon by a beneficent Providence. Its a carry-over from his work in musical comedy and as a struggling writer, but he is one of the few authors who make his leading characters writers, and one of the very few who throws them any of the good parts.
    
    This book is a double bonus, with not only Ashe, but a female writer, Joan Valentine, who knows even more of the hard-bitten life of the streets, and is therefore even poorer and more reckless, as a stellar second in the personnel. Throw in all sorts of millionaires and mix-ups, maids and butlers, a loveable, old, potty Earl, and the beginning of the crime wave at Blandings, and you have the makings of either a rollicking musical comedy or a long series of delightful novels. With Wodehouse it was both. He alternated between the two worlds and if Something Fresh were a film or a musical, Ashe and Joan would no doubt break into song and start dancing about the parlour, as do Gracie Allen, George Burns and Fred Astaire in the Gershwin Brothers film adaption of Wodehouses novel, A Damsel in Distress.
    
    An easy and enjoyable read - and the beginning of a series that just gets better and better. Absolutely recommended.
    Show book