Slay dragons. Discover the killer. Make Love. Read without limits. #WorldBookDay offer until April 28!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Live or Die - Poems - cover

Live or Die - Poems

Anne Sexton

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 1
  • 7
  • 0

Summary

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize: A gripping poetry collection mapping the thorny journey from madness to hope With her emotionally raw and deeply resonant third collection, Live or Die, Anne Sexton confirmed her place among the most celebrated poets of the twentieth century. Sexton described the volume, which depicts a fictionalized version of her struggle with mental illness, as “a fever chart for a bad case of melancholy.” From the halls of a psychiatric hospital—“the scene of the disordered scenes” in “Flee on Your Donkey”—to a child’s playroom—“a graveyard full of dolls” in “Those Times . . .”—these gripping poems offer profound insight on the agony of depression and the staggering acts of courage and faith required to emerge from its depths.   Along with other confessional poets like Sylvia Plath and Robert Lowell, Sexton was known for grappling with intimate subjects traditionally considered taboo for poetry such as motherhood, menstruation, and drug dependence. Live or Die features these topics in candid and unflinching detail, as Sexton represents the full experience of being alive—and a woman—as few poets have before. Through bold images and startlingly precise language, Sexton explores the broad spectrum of human emotion ranging from desperate despair to unfettered hope.

Other books that might interest you

  • George Eliot The Poetry - cover

    George Eliot The Poetry

    George Eliot

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Mary Anne Evans was born in 1819.  Her Father did not consider her a great beauty and thought her chances of marriage were slim.  He therefore invested in her education.  By 1850 she had moved to London to work at the Westminster Review where she published many articles and essays.  Her view on literature had taken some time to coalescence but with the publication of parts of &quote;Scenes From A Clerical Life&quote; in 1858  she knew she wanted to be a novelist and as her 1856 titled essay &quote;Silly Novels by Lady Novelists&quote; stated not a 'silly woman's one at that.  Success of course meant that her real name came out but it seemed not to affect how the public devoured her novels.   Here, we look with a keen eye at her poetry.  Although slim in number she is able to take a situation, scene or thought and bring us into its world with undeniable care.   Many of these titles are on our audiobook version which can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores.
    Show book
  • Tagore The Poetry Of - cover

    Tagore The Poetry Of

    Rabindranath Tagore

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Tagore was a true Renaissance man, distinguishing himself as a gifted philosopher, social and political reformer as well as a popular author in all literary genres.  His most famous poem, extracts of which are recorded here, is Gitanjali which earned him the distinction of the first Asian writer to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.  His songs include both the Indian and Bangladeshi national anthems.   Many of these titles are on our audiobook version which can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores.
    Show book
  • Shakesplish - How We Read Shakespeare's Language - cover

    Shakesplish - How We Read...

    Paula Blank

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    For all that we love and admire Shakespeare, he is not that easy to grasp. He may have written in Elizabethan English, but when we read him, we can't help but understand his words, metaphors, and syntax in relation to our own. Until now, explaining the powers and pleasures of the Bard's language has always meant returning it to its original linguistic and rhetorical contexts. Countless excellent studies situate his unusual gift for words in relation to the resources of the English of his day. They may mention the presumptions of modern readers, but their goal is to correct and invalidate any false impressions. Shakesplish is the first book devoted to our experience as modern readers of Early Modern English. Drawing on translation theory and linguistics, Paula Blank argues that for us, Shakespeare's language is a hybrid English composed of errors in comprehension—and that such errors enable, rather than hinder, some of the pleasures we take in his language. Investigating how and why it strikes us, by turns, as beautiful, funny, sexy, or smart, she shows how, far from being the fossilized remains of an older idiom, Shakespeare's English is also our own.
    Show book
  • Poetry Of American Patriotism - cover

    Poetry Of American Patriotism

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The United States of America: Land of the Brave, Home of the Free.  The United States was born by rebelling from the grasp of the British Empire, forging its own unique identity with a constitution based on equality for all.  Undoubtedly this was an ideal rather than a standard for all. However what has been taken up by all is a love of Country proudly held by all.  Many may disagree with the Government of the day but all support the idea of America.  Here its eminent wordsmiths craft their views and thoughts in beautiful poems that explain, deepen and bring forth that love of country expressed as Patriotism.
    Show book
  • Milk and Honey - cover

    Milk and Honey

    Rupi Kaur

    • 15
    • 106
    • 0
    The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.
    Show book
  • First Person Sorrowful - cover

    First Person Sorrowful

    Ko Un

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Ko Un has long been a living legend in Korea, both as a poet and as a person. Allen Ginsberg once wrote, 'Ko Un is a magnificent poet, combination of Buddhist cognoscente, passionate political libertarian, and naturalist historian.' When a writer has published as much as Ko Un has in the course of more than fifty years of writing, it is hard to know where to begin, what to translate. For this collection, his translators have selected a hundred or so poems from the five collections published since the year 2002, collections acclaimed by Korean criti as bringing poetry to a new level of cosmic reference. Nothing shows more clearly his stature as a writer than the variety of themes and emotions found in his most recent work. Readers here have access for the first time to many of the poems Ko Un has produced in the 21st century, as he approaches his eightieth year, his energy and originality unabated. As Michael McLure wrote years ago: 'Ko Un's poetry has the old-fashionedness of a muddy rut on a country road after rain, and yet it is also as state-of-the-art as a DNA micro-chip.' That remains true today.
    Show book