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My Name is Not Wigs! - Or the day I thought PAVAROTTI was a stagehand - cover

My Name is Not Wigs! - Or the day I thought PAVAROTTI was a stagehand

Angela Cobbin

Publisher: Self Publishing Partnership

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Summary

An enthralling journey through time, fashion and theatreland: from hairdressing student in the early 1960s to theatrical wig creator for the biggest shows of our time over five decades – from the West End to Broadway – Box Brownie to Cinemascope. My Name Is Not Wigs is the ultimate read for fans of witty behind-the-curtains memoirs, especially those with a penchant for the bright lights of stage and screen: tears and accolades aplenty!

‘A unique backstage story – honest and good-humoured, like the author.’ – Sir Ian McKellen
‘A glorious cavalcade of theatrical gossip and professional achievement in a department of our profession that largely goes unsung.’ – Frances de la Tour
‘A wonderful read and so well written with plenty of fascinating stories.’ – Sir Michael Gambon

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