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The Early Diary of Anaïs Nin - 1923–1927 - cover

The Early Diary of Anaïs Nin - 1923–1927

Anaïs Nin

Publisher: Mariner Books

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Summary

A revealing look at the life of this “extraordinary and unconventional writer” during the mid-1920s (The New York Times Book Review).   In this volume of her earlier series of personal diaries, Anaïs Nin tells how she exorcised the obsession that threatened her marriage—and nearly drove her to suicide.   “Through sheer nerve, confidence, and will, Nin made of the everyday something magical. This was a gift, indeed, and it’s a fascinating process to witness.” —The Christian Science Monitor   With an editor’s note by Rupert Pole and a preface by Joaquin Nin-Culmell

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