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A Wave From Mama - cover

A Wave From Mama

A. Robert Allen

Publisher: A. Robert Allen

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Summary

A former slave gets his dream job working on the Brooklyn Bridge project, but becomes a pawn in a battle involving the gangs of Irishtown and the corrupt Metropolitan Police.
 
Will his special physical abilities help him survive or will his awkward social deficits prove to be too much to overcome?
 
1863 Weeksville, Brooklyn- The free Black community of Weeksville becomes home to an unusually small boy and his mother who fled Manhattan during New York’s Draft Riots. When his mother succumbs to her injuries, the boy swears revenge against everyone and everything that contributed to her death. His diminutive size and acrobatic climbing abilities make him a spectacle to behold, while his awkward social habits make him an outcast to everyone in Weeksville, except the adopted family he swears to protect.
 
When his stepbrother is attacked, the boy becomes embroiled in a battle between the Irish Gangs and Whiskey Kings of Irishtown while the corrupt Metropolitan Police sit on the sidelines. The backdrop of the action is the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the racial tensions of the period.
 
A WAVE FROM MAMA is a stand-alone story connected in concept with the other volumes in the Slavery and Beyond Series.
 
 

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