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Relativity - The Special and the General Theory - cover

Relativity - The Special and the General Theory

Albert Einstein

Publisher: Samaira Book Publishers

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Summary

After completing the final version of his general theory of relativity in November 1915, Albert Einstein wrote a book about relativity for a popular audience. His intention was 'to give an exact insight into the theory of relativity to those readers who, from a general scientific and philosophical point of view, are interested in the theory, but who are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics.' The book remains one of the most lucid explanations of the special and general theories ever written. In the early 1920s alone, it was translated into ten languages, and fifteen editions in the original German appeared over the course of Einstein's lifetime. The theory of relativity enriched physics and astronomy during the 20th century. 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Albert Einstein, a gentleman who belongs to the elite league of Newton, Tesla, Maxwell and considered to be the greatest scientist of 20th century. Born in Germany, and worked as a clerk in the patent office before revolutionizing the world of physics, Einstein with his incredible achievements in scientific world has become synonymous to the word genius. He provided the world, two of the most brilliant concepts of physics through his theories of relativity, and won the Noble Prize in Physics for his work on Photoelectric Effect, which eventually become the foundation stone for tremendous developments in electronic technologies and quantum theory. Einstein is not only celebrated as the greatest physicists of all the time but he was also a wonderful human being and philosopher. World War II and presence of Adolf Hitler in Germany forced him to stay in the US during the period, where he consistently tried hard to warn and evade the application of nuclear fission as a weapon of mass destruction. He collaborated and interacted with many extraordinary minds of his time contributing to the world of physics and humanity as a whole. His unmatched intellectual imagination collaged with his immense interest in music, philosophy and humanity makes him the greatest personality that scientific world and mankind have ever seen.

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