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Before You Say Anything (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

Before You Say Anything (NHB Modern Plays)

Theatre Malaprop, Carys D. Coburn

Publisher: Nick Hern Books

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Summary

Imagine no one loves you and you have to leave home with nothing. Where would you go? Would you feel free? Are you free at all if your 'choices' hurt?
A play that questions how everyone can be safe at the same time, Before You Say Anything is a time-travelling set of interweaving stories exploring injustice, freedom, and bravery.
Created by Carys D. Coburn with MALAPROP Theatre, it was first staged at the 2020 Dublin Fringe Festival.
MALAPROP Theatre is an award-winning collective of Irish theatremakers, who seek to challenge, delight and speak to the world we live in (even when imagining different ones).
'Subtle, timely and beautifully paced… riveting' - Irish Times
'Reminiscent of early Carly Churchill… This is thinking theatre at its best' - Irish Independent
Available since: 10/26/2023.
Print length: 50 pages.

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