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The Red Badge of Courage - cover

The Red Badge of Courage

Stephen Crane

Publisher: Wildside Press

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Summary

The Red Badge of Courage is a classic war novel by Stephen Crane (1871–1900), an American author. Set during the American Civil War, it tells the story of a young private in the Union Army, Henry Fleming, who flees from the field of battle. Overcome with shame, he longs for a wound, the titular “red badge of courage,” to hide his cowardice. When his regiment once again faces the enemy, Henry becomes the standard-bearer—always a target for enemy forces—carrying the American flag.
Available since: 01/20/2022.

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