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My Name Is Philippa - cover

My Name Is Philippa

Philippa Ryder

Publisher: Mercier Press

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Summary

My Name is Philippa: A Transgender Memoir of Love, Understanding and Transformation. Experience a heart-changing journey with Philippa Ryder as she transitions from male to female with the support of her family. This powerful and moving story explores the physical and emotional process of transitioning and provides answers to common questions about being transgender—a must-read for anyone seeking to understand and support the global movement towards gender freedom and empowerment.
Available since: 10/21/2021.
Print length: 288 pages.

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