Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Skyscraper Lullaby (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

Skyscraper Lullaby (NHB Modern Plays)

James Fritz

Publisher: Nick Hern Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A powerful drama about two parents trying to come to terms with the disappearance of their toddler, written and first performed as an audio drama for Audible Original.
As they recount the events surrounding the disappearance of their toddler – one with a tendency to bite – two parents cope with grief in vastly different ways. While the father wrestles with feelings of guilt, the mother is convinced she's spotted the boy in frightening TV news reports… though let's just say he looks nothing like the precocious little boy they remember from a decade ago.
James Fritz's Skyscraper Lullaby is a haunting examination of the ways we cope with tragedy, complicity, and remorse. It was first produced as an audio play for Audible Original in 2022.
Available since: 10/26/2023.
Print length: 50 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Leaves of Grass The Original 1855 Edition - cover

    Leaves of Grass The Original...

    Walt Whitman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892).The poems of Leaves of Grass are loosely connected, with each representing Whitman's celebration of his philosophy of life and humanity. This book is notable for its discussion of delight in sensual pleasures during a time when such candid displays were considered immoral. Where much previous poetry, especially English, relied on symbolism, allegory, and meditation on the religious and spiritual, Leaves of Grass exalted the body and the material world.Influenced by Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Transcendentalist movement, itself an offshoot of Romanticism, Whitman's poetry praises nature and the individual human's role in it. However, much like Emerson, Whitman does not diminish the role of the mind or the spirit; rather, he elevates the human form and the human mind, deeming both worthy of poetic praise.
    Show book
  • Junkyard (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    Junkyard (NHB Modern Plays)

    Jack Thorne

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    'Who'd want to join in building a fucking playground.'
    It's 1979, rubbish is on the streets of Bristol, and it's tricky being Fiz. She's thirteen, she's got no money, her sister's pregnant and her mum thinks she's a waste of space...
    Rick remembers what it's like to be a teenager. So he thinks it won't take much to get a bunch of kids to help him build a playground out of junk.
    He's wrong. It takes everything he's got. But when it's finished, it's going to be something. It's going to be everything...
    Jack Thorne's honest and witty Junkyard, with music by Stephen Warbeck, premiered in 2017 in a co-production between Headlong, Bristol Old Vic, Rose Theatre Kingston and Theatr Clwyd, and directed by Jeremy Herrin.
    'A touching tale… an engagingly ramshackle musical' - The Times
    'A joyful musical for school misfits... left me smiling throughout as it celebrates the right of children and young people to turn their individual lives into an adventure through physical and imaginative play' - Guardian
    'A heartfelt new musical... energetic and fun... like Jacqueline Wilson meets Skins' - The Stage
    Show book
  • The Raven - cover

    The Raven

    Edgar Allan Poe

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door! 
    Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!” 
    Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.” 
      
    Nevermore…Nevermore…Nevermore. Ever since Edgar Allen Poe penned those words to paper in 1845, the infamous response of the raven has continued to echo throughout history. The poem has become so familiar that we know it in our bones. From the memorable opening line—Once upon a midnight dreary—Poe paints a bleak scene that swiftly catapults us to the depths of heartbreak and grief. 
      
    This edition opens with commentary from the great critic Edmund C. Stedman. His insights will satisfy students, scholars, and poetry enthusiasts looking to deepen their understanding of this profound piece of literature. 
      
    Poe’s written masterpiece truly comes alive in this audio performance. Experience the musical quality, heart-pounding rhythm, and haunting notes as never before. Nevermore…Nevermore…Nevermore.
    Show book
  • The Theogony - cover

    The Theogony

    Hesiod

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Theogony "the genealogy or birth of the gods" is a poem by Hesiod (8th – 7th century BC) describing the origins and genealogies of the Greek gods, composed c. 730–700 BC. It is written in the Epic dialect of Ancient Greek and contains 1022 lines. 
    Hesiod's Theogony is a large-scale synthesis of a vast variety of local Greek traditions concerning the gods, organized as a narrative that tells how they came to be and how they established permanent control over the cosmos. It is the first known Greek mythical cosmogony. The initial state of the universe is chaos, a dark indefinite void considered a divine primordial condition from which everything else appeared. Theogonies are a part of Greek mythology which embodies the desire to articulate reality as a whole; this universalizing impulse was fundamental for the first later projects of speculative theorizing.
    Hesiod appropriates to himself the authority usually reserved to sacred kingship. The poet declares that it is he, where we might have expected some king instead, upon whom the Muses have bestowed the two gifts of a scepter and an authoritative voice (Hesiod, Theogony 30–3), which are the visible signs of kingship. It is not that this gesture is meant to make Hesiod a king. Rather, the point is that the authority of kingship now belongs to the poetic voice, the voice that is declaiming the Theogony.
    Show book
  • Poetry of World War I The - Vol II - The Fallen Poets - cover

    Poetry of World War I The - Vol...

    Wilfred Owen, Rupert Brooke,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    War may be rationalized as ‘diplomacy by other means’ but the reality is that when tribes, Nations and peoples bring themselves into armed conflict with one another mayhem, terror and slaughter are the result. 
    In the First World War, The Great War, The War to End all Wars any idealistic aims that it was a ‘just cause’ and would be all over in a few months were shattered against the vast scale of millions dead or wounded all for the often temporary gains of a few miles of shell-pocked mud.  Human bodies were of little more value than the bullets and shells which mowed them down. 
    In this series of poetry volumes we look at the first world war from several viewpoints.  From poets who died, often in battle, during its torturous years, to the women who write of war and its consequences as well as an anthology of those poets, some still of fame, and some now forgotten with only their words to bear witness for what they have experienced. Each has an individual point of view that bears its own truth. 
    For the poets who fought in this conflict their first hand accounts often came at a terrible and irrevocable price.  In this volume we collect together the works of many poets who died during this tumultuous time.  Whilst their lives were cut tragically short their words endure. 
     This volume comes to you from Portable Poetry, a specialized imprint from Deadtree Publishing.  Our range is large and growing and covers single poets, themes, and many compilations.
    Show book
  • How These Desperate Men Talk (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

    How These Desperate Men Talk...

    Enda Walsh

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A short play written during the author's time working with European theatremakers, from the writer of Disco Pigs, Misterman and Ballyturk.
    Show book