Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Eisenhower Babies - Growing Up on Moonshots Comic Books and Black-and-White TV - cover

Eisenhower Babies - Growing Up on Moonshots Comic Books and Black-and-White TV

Ronnie Blair

Publisher: Advantage Media Group

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Eisenhower Babies takes readers on a journey to a time when World War II memories were still relatively fresh, space exploration was becoming more than just fantastical subject matter for science fiction, and television had barged its way into American homes, taking up permanent residence in a hallowed spot in front of the living room sofa. Among the millions of Eisenhower Babies who burst on the scene from January 1953 to January 1961 was Ronnie Blair. His memoir of growing up in a Kentucky coal-mining community from the late 1950s to the early 1970s weaves history, popular culture, and geography into a nostalgic journey interspersed with tales of coal-strike tensions and humorous family adventures. Eisenhower Babies is a celebration of the eccentricities of 1960s small-town life, where a police officer might promise to give a four-year-old his gun once the officer ran out of bullets, a neighbor could return from a Florida vacation with a live baby alligator as a new pet, and the children of World War II veterans waged imaginary battles against Hitler’s treachery in their hillside backyards.
Available since: 01/03/2023.
Print length: 176 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Actors and Singers - The Lives of Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley - cover

    Actors and Singers - The Lives...

    Kelly Mass

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This is a compilation of 2 different titles, which are about the following topics: 
    1: Marilyn Monroe has been part of the sexual revolution during the mid-20th century. Her influence in the movie industry, as an icon for attractiveness and femininity, have been noticed by hundreds of millions, even after her death. 
      
    Did Marilyn Monroe have success? Yes. Was her life easy? Not by far. Her failed marriages, early childhood trauma, mood disorder, and some of the struggles with her sexuality, contracts, and Hollywood producers have made her life go up and down so much that I’m sure she would describe some moments as the ultimate bliss and others as a living hell. 
      
    To understand such a complicated mess, a life covered in glamor and at the same time, tainted by manipulative individuals and her own weaknesses, addictions, and imperfections, we have to take a closer look. This way, we can understand why the world’s eyes were on her, and why she is still recognized as a symbol of attractiveness. 
    2: Elvis Presley is the famous singer who caused so much controversy that he was hated and loved among most of the American people. His sexual moves, his novel way of putting songs together… there was just something about him that attracted the ladies and the media attention at the same time. 
      
    Elvis didn’t grow up with wealth and fame. In a way, you could say he was living the American dream. However, he was kind of a bad boy as well, facing legal troubles, broken relationships and drug abuse. His death was lamented by many but his music lived on. Explore the era and methods of Elvis with us in this concise book/biography about his life.
    Show book
  • Barefoot in the Bindis - cover

    Barefoot in the Bindis

    Angela Wales

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Scottish-born Robert Wales sailed into Sydney Harbour during WWII, but in 1953 he was choking in the city and doctors prescribed fresh country air. With no experience and only knowledge he'd picked up from a few books, he uproots his family and sets out to establish a sheep farm in the bush. When they arrive on a lonely hill in northern New South Wales, they have no electricity, no running water, no telephone and no choice but to make this their home. From Angela Wales, eldest of the five kids, comes this extraordinarily vivid and evocative account of the next ten years as they try to tame six thousand acres of bush and navigate the challenges of country life. Filled with drama and hilarity, joy and back-breaking toil, Barefoot in the Bindis portrays a childhood spent in the outback, and is a sensational picture of Australia's past.
    Show book
  • The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams - cover

    The Daring Life and Dangerous...

    Jonathan Ned Katz

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Eve Adams was a rebel. Born Chawa Zloczewer into a Jewish family in Poland, Adams emigrated to the United States in 1912. The young woman befriended anarchists, sold radical publications, took a new name, and ran lesbian-and-gay-friendly speakeasies in Chicago and New York. Then, in 1925, Adams risked all to write and publish a book titled Lesbian Love. In a repressive era, long before today's gay liberation movement, when American women had just gained the right to vote, Adams's bold activism caught the attention of the young J. Edgar Hoover and the US Bureau of Investigation, leading to her surveillance and arrest. In a case that pitted immigration officials, the New York City police, and a biased informer against her, Adams was convicted of publishing an obscene book and of attempted sex with a policewoman sent to entrap her. Adams was jailed and then deported back to Europe, and ultimately murdered by Nazis in Auschwitz.In The Daring Life and Deadly Times of Eve Adams, acclaimed historian Jonathan Ned Katz has recovered the extraordinary story of an early, daring activist. Drawing on startling evidence, carefully distinguishing fact from fiction, Katz presents the first biography of Adams, and the publisher reprints the long-lost text of Adams's rare, unique book Lesbian Love.
    Show book
  • Jane Welsh Carlyle and Her Victorian World - A Story of Love Work Marriage and Friendship - cover

    Jane Welsh Carlyle and Her...

    Kathy Chamberlain

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Intelligent, witty, thoroughly engaging . . . the most fascinating biography I have read in years.” —The Minneapolis Star Tribune   She was one of the all-time great letter writers, according to Virginia Woolf, but as the wife of Victorian literary celebrity Thomas Carlyle, Jane Welsh Carlyle has been much overlooked. In this “hugely satisfying” new biography (The Spectator), Kathy Chamberlain brings Jane out of her husband’s shadow, focusing on Carlyle as a remarkable woman and writer in her own right.   Caught between her own literary aspirations and Victorian society’s oppression of women, Jane Welsh Carlyle hoped to move beyond domestic life and become a respected published writer. As she and her husband moved in exclusive London literary circles, mingling with noted authors, poets, and European revolutionaries, Carlyle created and reported to her correspondents on her rich, rewarding life in her Chelsea home—until her husband’s infatuation with a wealthy, imposing aristocratic society hostess threw her life into chaos. Through dedicated research and unparalleled access to Jane Welsh Carlyle’s private correspondence, Chamberlain presents an elegant portrait of an extraordinary woman.   “Sparkles with the wit and intelligence of the subject herself . . . If you think, as I originally did, that you have no particular interest in the life of Jane Carlyle, read this—you will be captivated.” —Elizabeth Strout, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lucy by the Sea   “Compelling . . . illuminates the outwardly decorous but often inwardly tempestuous lives of Victorian women.” —The New Yorker   “Chamberlain, Jane’s latest and incomparably best biographer . . . gives us, at last, a Jane Carlyle who seems thrillingly alive.” —Christian Science Monitor
    Show book
  • I Am Me - My Personal Journey with My Forty Plus Autistic Son - cover

    I Am Me - My Personal Journey...

    Marlene Ringler

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A mother of an adult child with autism ponders what happens to children like hers when their parents and families are no longer around to care for them.I Am Me challenges the values and priorities of institutions, communities, and systems to grapple with what is today referred to as a “tsunami”—the nearly 50,000 children who each year face an adult world so sadly unprepared to deal with their ever-growing needs. Like snowflakes, each autistic is different, no less, and deserves respect. It is a journey told through the prism of a mother who offers, hope, belief, and conviction that the life of a child with autism can and should be fulfilling and rewarding, and who compels readers to engage in helping to make the world a safer and better place for those affected by this mysterious condition. In her personal story, Dr. Marlene Ringler takes us into the world of the autistic and helps us to appreciate the complexities of living in a world where being different is a lifelong struggle. She shares her own investigation of this complex neurological disorder, looking for answers where few, if any, exist. Her fascinating journey directly addresses those very human questions as she presents her research findings and current investigations into the spectrum disorder in everyday language.“Marlene has gifted the autism community with a guide that will be useful to parents and others wishing to understand autism from the autism community at large.” —Stephen Mark Shore, EdD, author of Beyond the Wall: Personal Experiences with Autism and Asperger Syndrome
    Show book
  • To Alcatraz Death Row and Back - Memories of an East LA Outlaw - cover

    To Alcatraz Death Row and Back -...

    Rafael Pérez-Torres, Ernie López

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This prison memoir vividly recounts a life of abuse, crime, and incarceration, and reveals the harrowing reality inside America’s broken prison system.   When Ernie López was a boy selling newspapers in Depression-era Los Angeles, he would face beatings from his father for not bringing home enough money. When the beatings became unbearable, López took to petty stealing to make up the difference. By thirteen, he was stealing cars, a practice that landed him in California’s harshest juvenile reformatory. So began his cycle of crime and incarceration.   López spent decades in some of America’s most notorious prisons, including four and a half years on death row for a murder he insists he did not commit. To Alcatraz, Death Row, and Back is the story of a man who refused to be broken by his abusive father, or by America’s abusive criminal justice system.   While López admits “I’ve been no angel,” his insider’s account of life in Alcatraz and San Quentin graphically reveals the violence, arbitrary punishment, and unending monotony that give rise to gang cultures within the prisons and practically insure that parolees will commit far worse crimes when they return to the streets.
    Show book