Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Pier-Glass - cover

The Pier-Glass

Robert Graves

Publisher: DigiCat

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In Robert Graves' novel 'The Pier-Glass', the reader is immersed in a gripping tale of love, betrayal, and redemption set against the backdrop of a post-World War I England. The book's lyrical prose and intricate storytelling style evoke a sense of nostalgia and melancholy, reflecting the author's own experiences as a war veteran and poet. Graves' exploration of the complexities of human relationships and the impact of historical events on personal lives adds depth to the narrative, making it a compelling read for anyone interested in literary fiction of the early 20th century. 'The Pier-Glass' can be seen as a reflection of the author's own struggles with trauma and loss, as well as his deep understanding of the human condition. Readers looking for a thought-provoking and emotionally resonant novel will find 'The Pier-Glass' to be a rewarding and memorable literary experience.
Available since: 06/02/2022.
Print length: 237 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Lost in Yonkers - cover

    Lost in Yonkers

    Neil Simon

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Set in Yonkers, New York in 1942, two boys, aged 13 and 16, must spend one year with their austere and demanding grandmother. While the war rages in Europe, Jay and Arty learn the ropes from Uncle Louie and assorted relatives, all peculiar characters.An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Barbara Bain, Gia Carides, Dan Castellaneta, Ben Diskin, Arye Gross, Roxanne Hart and Kenneth Schmidt.
    Show book
  • Fugitive Pieces - Poetry of Lord Byron - cover

    Fugitive Pieces - Poetry of Lord...

    Lord Byron

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    George Gordon, later Lord Byron, published Fugitive Pieces in 1806 when he was only 18 years old. It was printed, but Byron's friends - particularly Reverend Thomas Beecher - advised him that it contained poems that were scandalously amorous, particularly the poem To Mary. Byron suppressed it by having all the copies destroyed - or so he thought. As it happened, Thomas Beecher himself kept his copy, and there were three other copies that were not destroyed.Reverend Beecher's opinion was certainly correct, though his advice was inexcusable. The amorous poetry in this volume, particularly To Mary, is some of the most erotic serious poetry in English up to that time. Byron was an intensely emotional, intensely sexual young man, and his poetry shows it very clearly. It also shows the work of a young man with the makings of not only a serious poet, but a skillful satirist and humorist as well. While many of the poems are deeply romantic, indeed rather melodramatic effusions of the sort one would expect from the young man who would become a founder of the Romantic movement, others read more like Ogden Nash—witty, lively and skillfully done in happy, bouncing rhymes and meters, not at all what one might expect. 
    This recording of the volume Fugitive Pieces is based on the original volume as later published in limited-edition form. For that reason, the reader who knows Byron’s poetry well will notice that some of the texts used here differ, sometimes markedly, from the versions more commonly found. Byron revised and republished these early poems several times under several titles, most notably Pieces on Various Occasions and Hours of Idleness. Later titles in this series, which aims to present the whole of Byron’s poetry, will use the later versions of these same poems. In some cases the two versions are nearly identical.A Freshwater Seas production.
    Show book
  • The Norman Conquests - cover

    The Norman Conquests

    Alan Ayckbourn

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Ayckbourn’s celebrated triology The Norman Conquests - three hilarious and poignant plays depicting the same six characters in one house over one weekend, namely Norman and his romantic follies.Table Manners:England’s famous seducer of other men’s wives lays siege to his sister-in-law in the first “battle”. A middle-class family trying to have a pleasant country weekend is no match for Norman, who horrifies everyone by doing exactly as he likes.Living Together:In the second “battle” Norman gets drunk on homemade wine – and all hell breaks loose. He unleashes his merry brand of manipulative charm on the hapless guests and even his most formidable opponents go down in defeat on the drawing room rug.Round and Round the Garden:In the third “battle” the setting is Mother’s overgrown English garden, where something more troublesome than brambles lurks among the roses. Havoc ensues as this satirical masterpiece makes its way to a hilarious conclusion.L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performances featuring:Rosalind Ayres as SarahKenneth Danziger as RegMartin Jarvis as NormanJane Leeves as AnnieChristopher Neame as TomCarolyn Seymour as Ruth
    Show book
  • Stones in His Pockets & A Night in November - Two Plays - cover

    Stones in His Pockets & A Night...

    Marie Jones

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Two plays by award-winning playwright Marie Jones: the smash hit Stones in His Pockets, which ran for four years in London's West End; and an earlier monologue, A Night in November, exploring the subjects of football and sectarianism, set during the 1994 World Cup.
    A two-man show about the filming of a Hollywood epic in rural Ireland, Stones in His Pockets features a pair of film extras, Charlie and Jake, who tell the story by taking on all the roles themselves.
    A Night In November follows Kenneth McCallister, family man and Ulsterman, on the fateful night in November in Belfast when the Republic of Ireland qualifies against Northern Ireland for the World Cup, and Kenneth finds himself watching the sectarian hatred of the crowd rather than the football.
    'a delightful piece... often richly funny' Telegraph on Stones in His Pockets
    'an unalloyed source of joy, laughter, tears and delight... Marie Jones's script digs deep and dark while giving us two hours of serious pleasure' Daily Mail on Stones In His Pockets
    'Jones builds an astonishingly complete, acute, funny and humane picture - a complete theatrical tour de force - hilarious, loveable and at times even breathtaking' Scotsman on Stones in His Pockets
    Show book
  • The Ice Palace - Author of the Great Gatsby Fitzgerald writes through the eyes of an independent young woman and the consequences of her romantic choices - cover

    The Ice Palace - Author of the...

    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born on 24th September 1896 in Saint Paul, Minnesota into an upper-middle class family. Whilst his mother was pregnant with him, his two young sisters tragically died.  Fitzgerald once said this was when his destiny as a writer was ordained. 
     
    His intelligence and talent was recognised from an early age, with his first story, about a detective being published in the school magazine when he was just 13.   
     
    In 1913 he enrolled at Princeton but his devotion to his own literary pursuits resulted in him leaving and, rather bizarrely, joining the Army.  In 1918, stationed at Fort Sheridan near Montgomery, Alabama he met and became infatuated and then inseparable from Zelda Sayre.  Initially though she refused to marry him but with the success of ‘This Side of Paradise’, the fame and the flow of money enabled them both to begin a gilded life.  For them this was The Jazz Age.  For Fitzgerald he was already an alcoholic. 
     
    He continued to write with great mastery and the titles of his novels and many of his 164 short stories are household names.  The Great Gatsby, often cited as The Great American Novel was published to mixed reviews.  As America moved from the Great Depression to the slaughter of the Second World War his works and himself were seen as far too entwined with the decadent twenties. The world had moved on and he hadn’t.   
     
    Further tragedy was never far from his life. Zelda after years of erratic and now intolerable behaviour was committed to an institution in 1936.  His own sales began to decline and he became a hack for hire in Hollywood, dependent on increasing amounts of booze and the weekly pay check.  His drunken state had often resulted in arrest or hospitalisation, further imperiling his talents.   Despite his contribution to many MGM films he received only one credit. 
     
    The end came all too soon for one of America’s greatest ever writers.  On 21st December 1940, at only 44 years of age in Hollywood, F Scott Fitzgerald succumbed to a heart attack. 
     
    One of Fitzgerald’s short story gems is ‘The Ice Palace’. A Southern girl wants ‘to live where things happen on a grand scale’.  She is engaged to a Yankee but on their visit to The Ice Palace attraction life reveals a very different destiny for her.
    Show book
  • The Rose of Sharing - cover

    The Rose of Sharing

    Mark Trudeau

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A collection of poems touching on love, mental health and the struggle to live a better life.
    Show book