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Dragon Ball Culture Volume 1 - Origin - cover

Dragon Ball Culture Volume 1 - Origin

Derek Padula

Publisher: Derek Padula

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Summary

See Dragon Ball with new eyes. This book is your cultural tour guide of Dragon Ball, the world's most recognized anime and manga series.Over 11 years in development, Dragon Ball Culture is a 7 Volume analysis of your favorite series. You will go on an adventure with Son Goku, from Chapter 1 to 194 of the original Dragon Ball series, as we explore every page, every panel, and every sentence, to reveal the hidden symbolism and deeper meaning of Dragon Ball.In Volume 1 you will enter the mind of Akira Toriyama and discover the origin of Dragon Ball. How does Toriyama get his big break and become a manga author? Why does he make Dragon Ball? Where does Dragon Ball's culture come from? And why is it so successful?Along the way you'll be informed, entertained, and inspired. You will learn more about your favorite series and about yourself.Now step with me through the doorway of Dragon Ball Culture.

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