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The Prado Art Guide - 96 essential masterpieces - cover

The Prado Art Guide - 96 essential masterpieces

Carlos Javier Taranilla de la Varga

Publisher: ArgoNowta

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Summary

The most wonderful and clear art guide to explore and learn all the fundamentals of the greatest works, artists, schools of art and styles in the Prado Museum.Discover the Prado, one of the premier art galleries in the world. Explore and appreciate the greatest masterpieces and the artists who created them: El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Botticelli, Raphael, the Venetians, Rubens, Rembrandt, Lorraine, Poussin, 19th century Spanish painting plus the best sculptural and decorative works it treasures in its collections. Learn its history and transformation from picture gallery to global treasured museum, which houses one of the very best collections of European art in the world including the most complete collection of Spanish paintings.
Available since: 10/01/2022.
Print length: 316 pages.

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