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CIVIL WAR – Complete History of the War Documents Memoirs & Biographies of the Lead Commanders - cover

CIVIL WAR – Complete History of the War Documents Memoirs & Biographies of the Lead Commanders

Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, John Esten Cooke, William T. Sherman, James Ford Rhodes, Frank H. Alfriend

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

This meticulously edited collection contains a Pulitzer Prize awarded History of Civil War, as well as the memoirs of the two most important military commanders of the Union, Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman, complete with biographies of Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. Finally, this collection is enriched with pivotal historical documents which provide an explicit insight into this decisive period of the American past. Content:   History of the Civil War, 1861-1865 Leaders & Commanders of the Union: Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman Leaders & Commanders of the Confederation: Jefferson Davis  Robert E. Lee Civil War Documents: The Emancipation Proclamation Gettysburg Address Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution Presidential Actions and Addresses by Abraham Lincoln: 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865
Available since: 12/14/2023.
Print length: 3541 pages.

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