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Taildragger Tales: My Late-Blooming Romance with a Piper Cub and Her Younger Sisters - cover

Taildragger Tales: My Late-Blooming Romance with a Piper Cub and Her Younger Sisters

Daniel Ford

Publisher: Warbird Books

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Summary

Dan Ford learned to fly at the age when most men are well into retirement. In this short book, he tells how it was to have a flight instructor one-third his age, to make a Sentimental Journey to the Pennsylvania airport where the Piper Cub first saw the light of day, to practice spins and aerobatic turns in a Great Lakes biplane, to fly low and slow in New Jersey, to make a leisurely tour around Lake Winnipesaukee and into his past, and to have a close encounter with the National Defense Emergency of September 11, 2001. A delightful read for anyone who ever dreamed of becoming a pilot. About 11,000 words (44 print pages).

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