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Incident at Muc Wa: A Story of the Vietnam War - cover

Incident at Muc Wa: A Story of the Vietnam War

Daniel Ford

Publisher: Warbird Books

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Summary

This is the story that inspired the acclaimed Burt Lancaster film, Go Tell the Spartans. It's 1964--early days in South Vietnam--and the U.S. Army Raiders have garrisoned a town that the French abandoned ten years before. The Viet Cong attack; the Americans reinforce. They're not about to repeat the mistakes of the French! "'Sad, bawdy, and compelling," wrote the Detroit Free Press. Prophetic, too, of how the larger war would end. Revised 2015 edition.

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