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The Lady and the Tigers: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Served with the Flying Tigers in Burma and China 1941-1942 - cover

The Lady and the Tigers: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Served with the Flying Tigers in Burma and China 1941-1942

Olga Greenlaw

Publisher: Warbird Books

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Summary

Olga Greenlaw kept the War Diary of the American Volunteer Group--the Flying Tigers--while those gallant mercenaries defended Burma and China from Japanese aggression during the opening months of the Pacific War. Returning to the United States in 1942, she wrote The Lady and the Tigers, which war correspondent Leland Stowe hailed as "an authoritative, gutsy and true to life story of the AVG."  
 
Out of print for more than half a century, her book was brought up to date by Daniel Ford, author of the prize-winning history, Flying Tigers: Claire Chennault and His American Volunteers, 1941-1942. What's more, Ford explained for the first time where Olga and Harvey Greenlaw came from, how they became caught up in the saga of the Flying Tigers, and what became of them after their tumultuous year with the AVG. With photographs from the print edition.

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