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Me the Boat and a Guy Named Bob - cover

Me the Boat and a Guy Named Bob

C.E. Bowman

Publisher: C.E. Bowman

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Summary

In the spring of 1972 a twenty-year-old kid from California took off to see the world. His journeys led him down the East African coast and across several oceans to a magical Caribbean island and the building of a beautiful boat. This schooner, christened Water Pearl, was owned in part by the legendary musician Bob Dylan. "I'm either on the West Coast or in New York or down in the Caribbean. Me and another guy own a boat down there," he once said. Finally, after forty years, here is the story of how through a cosmic chain of events this remarkable tale came to pass. 
450 pages

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