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Santa's Wicked Elf - cover

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Santa's Wicked Elf

Livvy Ward

Publisher: RoseLark Publishing

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Summary

Hollie Nikolas had been away from home for awhile; school and a normal life in her aunt's home. Back with her family at last, she's ready to take her place in her father's workshop. But the tall, gorgeous elf who runs her father's stables is wreaking havoc on all her plans. 
Grant Vaughn had been in love with Hollie for as long as he could remember. Friends as children, his feelings had remained true throughout her absence. Now he's all grown up and Hollie is home again. 
This holiday season throws each of their lives into disarray. And one thing's for sure. Hollie has designs on. . . 
Santa's Wicked Elf.
Available since: 10/08/2019.

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