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They Called Me Dummy - cover

They Called Me Dummy

Amilcar Hernandez

Publisher: Amilcar Hernandez

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Summary

As a child, the author suspected there was something wrong with him. In his mid-thirties, he sought help and that is when he discovered and confirmed he had a learning disability (LD). This book is about his experiences growing old with several forms of LD. The author writes of events that span from his childhood up to his golden years. He shares his struggles, his victories, his pains, and his joys. His story will give you an insight into the frustrations, anxieties, challenges, and depression associated with LD. The author explains how he learned to understand and accept his limitations, which helped him to live a positive, satisfying, and rewarding life.

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