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Story Story! Story Come! - cover

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Story Story! Story Come!

Maimouna Jallow

Publisher: Maimouna Jallow

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Summary

Journey from Mali to Gambia to Ghana, where you will pause and remember at the Door of No Return. Continue to Nigeria through Niger. When you can't take the heat, quench your thirst in the Nile in South Sudan. This will lead you through Kenya and onward past Africa's biggest mountain on your way to being sprayed by the waters of Mosi oa Tunya in Zambia. Finally, rest in South Africa, for we have come to the end of our journey and the end of our story. Through riddles and songs, myths and legends, both children and adults are invited to delve into parallel worlds where they are taught valuable lessons on friendship, hard work, bravery and much more.
Available since: 06/14/2019.

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