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The Way We Met - cover

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The Way We Met

Patricia M Jackson

Publisher: Patricia M Jackson

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Summary

What is it that captures someone's heart? A touch, a smile, a spark that lasts a lifetime. 
Love is something that is shared by all and every couple has their unique story of how they met. This anthology of romantic short stories ranges in time from the late 1800s to the modern day with tales of the first glimpses of romance. 
From a tale of immigrants finding each other on Ellis Island to an accidental encounter in a crowded bar to an online romance, these stories are poignant and heartwarming, tinged with humor and a sense of inevitability. There may be a difference between his version and hers, but it is always the same chronicle of the stirrings of love. 
Join this journey for ten distinctly different Midwestern couples and read their first-person accounts of how they met. Discover how their journeys of love began! 

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