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The Bridge of Light in Quantum Physics - cover

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The Bridge of Light in Quantum Physics

Wim Vegt

Publisher: Wim Vegt

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Summary

The presented theory in this book has been grounded on a fundamental mathematical mistake in Classical Electromagnetic Field Theory with Impact on General Relativity, Quantum Physics and the boundaries of our Universe. 
The famous 1927 Solvay Conference was considered a turning point in the world of Physics. The scientific realists like Albert Einstein had lost and the instrumentalists like Niels Bohr had won the fundamental conflict. Since then Physics has followed the path of the instrumentalists in which Quantum Physics has been determined by the concept of Elementary Particles and Probability Waves. 
The instrumentalists do believe that what you measure is the truth. But unfortunately that is not the truth at all. Because we do not really measure with our instruments but finally we do measure with our mind. We can measure the speed of a sound wave and then we get a number. Is that the speed of sound? No, that is not the speed of sound at all. We measure the speed of sound with our mind. With our final conclusions. Some will call the found number simply the speed of sound. But other people will say. No, what was the speed of the wind when you measured it and then they will subtract the speed of the wind relative to the observer and calculate from there the speed of sound. Because indeed, the speed of sound we measure depends on the speed of the wind. Our mind will give us the final answers and not the measurements. 
When an ambulance moves towards us we will hear and we will measure a different pitch then when the ambulance has passed us and moves away from us. Measurements of the pitch will tell us nothing about the real pitch of the ambulance siren. Only with our mind we can come to the right conclusions. That is the point of view of the scientific realists like Albert Einstein. And they lost during that famous mind breaking 1927 Solvay Conference.  Where the mind lost from the desire and the greed to get results and to become famous. 
And since then the instrumentalists  have always ruled over the scientific realists. And people started to believe in numbers. The mind had been set aside and only the numbers count. And physics became a strange weird science with color forces and quarks.

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