Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
MASS: A Sniper a Father and a Priest - cover

MASS: A Sniper a Father and a Priest

Jo Scott-Coe

Publisher: Pelekinesis

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

On August 1, 1966, Charles Whitman climbed to the top of the University of Texas at Austin’s clock tower and performed the first televised and (at the time) deadliest mass shooting in American history. Two weeks after the murders, FBI agents interviewed a Catholic priest in Alaska who had known Whitman and his family for fifteen years. 
    Jo Scott-Coe discovered the report of this interview in an online search about the shooting nearly fifty years later. As a stray Catholic, she was intrigued: Was the priest still alive? What was the nature of his connection to the sniper? How had he been affected by his friend’s violence? What light did this relationship shed on the sniper’s experience of religion? 
    A search for simple answers led to more questions and five years of research, through archives and cross-country site visits, through interviews, newspaper reports, and public records. The winding path of the priest’s buried story—a mixed-up life with its own sad and ambiguous ending—led deeper into the rabbit-hole of mid-century American (and mostly male) power structures in the Church, in middle-class white families, in marriages, in scouting, in the military. “Normalcy,” at least on the outside, could hide a host of dysfunctions, perpetuated by unspoken allegiances and toxic permission. Invisible brotherhoods made it too easy for special men to lead double lives, turn destruction inwards, or lash out violently against those they claimed to love. 
     Not much has changed. Half a century since Whitman’s rampage, we now consume seemingly endless images of domestic terror from men wielding guns in public places: at schools, in movie theaters, churches, nightclubs, and city streets. But the “breaking news” ritual still blinds us to the terror such perpetrators have often first inflicted in private and have (sometimes) endured in their own childhoods.  
    Rather than deflecting Whitman’s responsibility or seeking a single cause for his final violent acts, MASS:A Sniper, a Father, and a Priest traces Scott-Coe’s struggle to explore the intersecting lives of adult men whose values imprinted upon Whitman long before he ever killed anyone. Scott-Coe turns the camera away from the spectacle and towards overlapping narratives in a broader cultural moment, showing how the sniper and his two fathers—one biological, one religious—were united by the most damaging traditions of American priesthood, both secular and sacred. 
    Employing a three-part structure that fuses two lyric meditations alongside a core of intensely researched narrative history, MASS:A Sniper, a Father, and a Priest probes the hidden wounds of paternal-pastoral failure and interrogates our collective American conscience. Contains extensive supplementary materials, including author’s notes and sources. 
 

Other books that might interest you

  • Dark History of the Tudors - Murder adultery incest witchcraft wars religious persecution piracy - cover

    Dark History of the Tudors -...

    Judith John

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    'Divorced, beheaded, died,
    Divorced, beheaded, survived.'
    – Rhyme describing the fates of Henry VIII’s wives
    
    Beginning with the victory of Henry Tudor over Richard III at Bosworth Field in 1485, and ending with the death of the childless Elizabeth I in 1603 following a 45-year reign, the Tudor dynasty marks a period in British history where England was transformed from a minor medieval kingdom to a preeminent European power on the verge of empire. 
    
    Yet this period of great upheaval had a dark side: Henry VIII’s notorious break with the Roman Catholic Church and his divorce or execution of four of his six wives; the sad story of teenaged Lady Jane Grey, who was monarch for just nine days before being executed in favor of the Catholic Mary I; and Queen Elizabeth I, who defeated the Spanish Armada, suppressed the Irish rebellion, and sponsored pirates and slave traders in the quest for new territories in America.
    
    Illustrated with 180 photographs, paintings, and illustrations, Dark History of the Tudors is a fascinating, accessible account of the murder, adultery, and religious turmoil that characterized England’s most infamous royal dynasty.
    Show book
  • Anne Rice: A Biography - cover

    Anne Rice: A Biography

    Sara Mceven

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Just as the journalist was so transfixed by the words of the enigmatic vampire penned by Anne Rice, so readers have been fascinated by her works. Born into the vibrant, mystical and deeply historical culture of New Orleans and raised in the Roman Catholic church, Rice has been producing bestsellers since 1976. Long before Angel and Spike, Edward Cullen or Bill Compton, Rice's vampires brought a unique take on the idea of undead bloodsuckers with complex human emotions. Her writing has never shied away from exploring dark places in the human or non-human psyche. Her lush and luxurious way with words brings her characters to life while also reveling in the ornate beauty of the written word. 
    Rice has also proven that she is capable of writing about more than vampires, with dozens of novels under her belt. Although she has influenced the Gothic subculture, Rice appeals to a broad range of readers, with fans from all walks of life. Her evocative and descriptive prose draws the reader in, weaving a spell as deftly as her supernatural characters.
    Show book
  • Mommie Dearest - cover

    Mommie Dearest

    Christina Crawford

    • 1
    • 3
    • 0
    A special edition of the “shocking” #1 New York Times bestseller with an exclusive new preface by the author (Los Angeles Times).   When Christina Crawford’s harrowing chronicle of child abuse was first published in 1978, it brought global attention to the previously closeted subject. It also shed light on the guarded world of Hollywood and stripped away the façade of Christina’s relentless, alcoholic abuser: her adoptive mother, movie star Joan Crawford.   Christina was a young girl shown off to the world as a fortunate little princess. But at home, her lonely, controlling, even ruthless mother made her life a nightmare. A fierce battle of wills, their relationship could be characterized as an ultimately successful, for Christina, struggle for independence. She endured and survived, becoming the voice of so many other victims who suffered in silence, and giving them the courage to forge a productive life out of chaos.   This ebook edition features an exclusive new preface by the author, plus rare photographs from her personal collection and one hundred pages of revealing material not found in the original manuscript.  
    Show book
  • Trump: The Art of The Deal by Donald J Trump - cover

    Trump: The Art of The Deal by...

    Leopard Books

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Trump: The Art of The Deal by Donald J. Trump | A 15-Minute Summary & Analysis 
    Preview: 
    In this book, Donald Trump outlines the major projects that made him the success he is today.  He adds details about his childhood and where he came from in order to give the reader an idea of how he became so wealthy.  From the beginning, Trump has been an aggressive negotiator and keeps on trying until he gets what he wants out of his deals.  He also compromises, but he emphasizes that he doesn’t pay more than what is fair.   
    Trump has enjoyed numerous successes, from building Trump Tower to owning two very successful casinos in Atlantic City.  The dealings have never been easy, but Trump has never backed down from a deal he felt was worth making. 
    PLEASE NOTE: This is a Summary and Analysis of the book and NOT the original book. 
    This companion includes the following:  
    ► Book Review 
    ► Character List 
    ► Summary of the Chapters 
    ► Discussion Questions 
    ► Analysis of Themes & Symbols 
    This Analysis fills the gap, making you understand more while enhancing your reading experience. 
    About the Author: 
    Leopard Books, is your perfect quick read companion. We analyze every chapter and hunt down the key points for your convenience. With in-depth summary and analysis, leap through books quickly and with ease.
    Show book
  • Herman Melville - cover

    Herman Melville

    Weaver Raymond

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “If ever, my dear Hawthorne,” wrote Melville in the summer of 1851, “we shall sit down in Paradise in some little shady corner by ourselves; and if we shall by any means be able to smuggle a basket of champagne there (I won’t believe in a Temperance Heaven); and if we shall then cross our celestial legs in the celestial grass that is forever tropical, and strike our glasses and our heads together till both ring musically in concert: then, O my dear fellow mortal, how shall we pleasantly discourse of all the things manifold which now so much distress us.” This serene and laughing desolation—a mood which in Melville alternated with a deepening and less tranquil despair—is a spectacle to inspire with sardonic optimism those who gloat over the vanity of human wishes. For though at that time Melville was only thirty-two years old, he had crowded into that brief space of life a scope of experience to rival Ulysses’, and a literary achievement of a magnitude and variety to merit all but the highest fame. Still did he luxuriate in tribulation. Well-born, and nurtured in good manners and a cosmopolitan tradition, he was, like George Borrow, and Sir Richard Burton, a gentleman adventurer in the barbarous outposts of human experience. Nor was his a kid-gloved and expensively staged dip into studio savagery. “For my part, I abominate all honourable respectable toils, trials, and tribulations of every kind whatsoever,” he declared. And as proof of this abomination he went forth penniless as a common sailor to view the watery world. He spent his youth and early manhood in the forecastles of a merchantman, several whalers, and a man-of-war. He diversified whale-hunting by a sojourn of four months among practising cannibals, and a mutiny off Tahiti. He returned home to New England to marry the daughter of Chief Justice Shaw of Massachusetts, and to win wide distinction as a novelist on both sides of the Atlantic. Though these crowded years had brought with them bitter hardship and keen suffering, he had sown in tears that he might reap in triumph. But when he wrote to Hawthorne he felt that triumph had not been achieved. Yet he needed but one conclusive gesture to provoke the world to cry this as a lie in his throat: one last sure sign to convince all posterity that he was, indeed, one whom the gods loved. But the gods fatally withheld their sign for forty years. Melville did not die until 1891...
    Show book
  • Starting Over - A Country Year and A Book of Bees - cover

    Starting Over - A Country Year...

    Sue Hubbell

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A pair of memoirs about a woman starting her life over as a beekeeper in the Ozarks, from “a latter-day Henry Thoreau with a sense of the absurd” (Chicago Tribune).   Taken together, the “steadily eloquent” national bestseller, A Country Year, and its follow-up, A Book of Bees, a New York Times Notable Book, offer a moving and fascinating chronicle of Sue Hubbell’s seasonal second life as a commercial beekeeper (The Washington Post).   Alone on a small Missouri farm after the end of a thirty-year marriage, Hubbell found a new love—of the winged, buzzing variety. Left with little but the commercial beekeeping and honey-producing business she started with her husband, Hubbell found solace in the natural world, as well as in writing about her experience. In evocative vignettes, she takes readers through the seasonal cycle of her life as a beekeeper, offering exquisitely rendered details of hives, harvests, and honey, while also reflecting on deeper questions. As the New York Times wrote: “The real masterwork that Sue Hubbell has created is her life.”
    Show book