Don't miss out on our offer of unlimited reading for a whole year!
Only until 29 April!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Wayfarers - cover

Wayfarers

Katrinka Moore

Publisher: Pelekinesis

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Nomadic outsiders wander in a mythological world subject to chance, good or bad fortune. A family crosses the American Southwest in the 1920s. And a home dweller explores the mystery of familiar places.  
In these poems, tales told by multiple narrators, wayfarers move through a sparsely populated terrain, finding hardship, beauty, peril, the ineffable. Some are escaping events beyond their control, some choose to roam, and others stay in place, delving into the interior landscape. 
 

Other books that might interest you

  • Christina's Rose of a Tear - cover

    Christina's Rose of a Tear

    Christopher Hope

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Christina's Rose of a Tear is a collection of poems dedicated to one individual that has helped me through the worst time of my life and has reopened my passion, soul, and heart. She inspired me to write this book in one day. To show that I can still write poems about sorrow and love. It captures my passion for life for one person. 
     
    
    The poems reflect my sorrows but mostly my love for one person that put me back together when I was at my lowest. She showed me it was okay to love again. Please enjoy the poems and the passion that are captured in the book.
    Show book
  • Pillow Thoughts - cover

    Pillow Thoughts

    Courtney Peppernell

    • 2
    • 9
    • 0
    Pillow Thoughts is a collection of poetry and prose about heartbreak, love, and raw emotions. It is divided into sections to read when you feel you need them most.
    Show book
  • Born to Love Cursed to Feel - cover

    Born to Love Cursed to Feel

    Samantha King

    • 5
    • 169
    • 0
    Born to Love, Cursed to Feel is about love—the good, the bad, and the confusing. It touches on morals and how when emotions are involved it’s not as black and white. The poetry is frequently written in a narrative manner that evocatively pulls you in and makes you feel. This book is about falling in love, bad decisions, and ultimately growth. The essence of it all is to show that no matter how far one falls all the mistakes don’t have to be what defines them.
    Show book
  • A Smidgen of Shakespeare - Brush up on the Bard with Quotations Trivia and Froli - cover

    A Smidgen of Shakespeare - Brush...

    Geoff Spiteri

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    If the mere mention of Shakespeare fills you with dread, evoking memories of arduous afternoons spent in stuffy classrooms with eccentric English teachers, it is time to reconsider that far from being three-hour marathons of unintelligible boring rubbish, Shakespeare's plays are in fact exciting, tragic, funny and often downright rude - full of memorable plots, great insults, filthy jokes and eccentric characters. A Smidgen of Shakespeare lets you know the essentials, as well as providing you with a wealth of facts and trivia to amuse, impress and entertain (at school, in a seminar or down the pub). Succinct, pithy entries cover everything from Shakespeare’s greatest villains to his most cutting insult (hint: it involves your mum). As a playwright, he is truly a global figure - his work has been translated into more than 70 of the world’s languages, including Latin, ancient Greek and even Klingon. Did you know, however, that Shakespeare's influence even extends into the outer reaches of our solar system? 24 of Uranus's 27 moons are named after Shakespeare characters. The hundreds of entries range from the truly enlightening to the utterly obscure in this comprehensive guide that will re-introduce you to the fascinating world of Shakespeare’s work.
    Show book
  • Poems of Joy and Celebration - cover

    Poems of Joy and Celebration

    Arcturus Publishing

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A collection of poems celebrating life, nature, spirituality and humour. Here you will find verses from infamous poets such as John Keats, Emily Dickinson and Rudyard Kipling on a range of joyful subjects including the natural world, faith, inspiration and irreverence and satire. For the religious and non-religion alike, you are sure to find something to get your soul singing.
    Show book
  • Paradise Regained - cover

    Paradise Regained

    John Milton

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Paradise Regained is a poem by English poet John Milton, first published in 1671 by John Macock. The volume in which it appeared also contained the poet's closet drama Samson Agonistes. Paradise Regained is connected by name to his earlier and more famous epic poem Paradise Lost, with which it shares similar theological themes; indeed, its title, its use of blank verse, and its progression through Christian history recall the earlier work. However, this effort deals primarily with the temptation of Christ as recounted in the Gospel of Luke.
    
    An interesting anecdote recounted by a Quaker named Thomas Ellwood provides some insight into Paradise Regained‍ '​s development. After studying Latin with Milton and reading the poet's epic Paradise Lost, Ellwood remarked, "Thou hast said much here of Paradise lost, but what hast thou to say of Paradise found?" Hearing this, Milton at first "sat some time in a muse" before changing the subject; however, later on he showed to Ellwood a new manuscript entitled Paradise Regained. Some maintain that although he seemed to express gratitude to Ellwood in a letter, Milton in truth "passed on a friendly if impish fabrication" that made Ellwood feel like the inspiration for the poem. Milton composed Paradise Regained at his cottage in Chalfont St Giles in Buckinghamshire. The poem is four books long, in contrast with Paradise Lost‍ '​s twelve. As such, Barbara K. Lewalski has labelled the work a "brief epic."
    
    Whereas Paradise Lost is ornate in style and decorative in its verse, Paradise Regained is carried out in a fairly plain style. Specifically, Milton reduces his use of simile and deploys a simpler syntax in Paradise Regained than he does in Paradise Lost, and this is consistent with Jesus's sublime plainness in his life and teachings (in the epic, he prefers Hebrew psalms to Greek poetry). Modern editors believe the stylistics of Paradise Regained evince Milton's poetic maturity. No longer is the poet out to dazzle his readers with bombastic verse and lengthy epic similes. This is not to say that the poem bears no affinities with Milton's earlier work, but scholars continue to agree with Northrop Frye's suggestion that Paradise Regained is "practically sui generis" in its poetic execution.
    
    One major concept emphasized throughout Paradise Regained is the idea of reversals. As implied by its title, Milton sets out to reverse the "loss" of Paradise. Thus, antonyms are often found next to each other, reinforcing the idea that everything that was lost in the first epic will be regained by the end of this "brief epic." Additionally, the work focuses on the idea of "hunger", both in a literal and in a spiritual sense. After wandering in the wilderness for forty days, Jesus is starving for food. Satan, too blind to see any non-literal meanings of the term, offers Christ food and various other temptations, but Jesus continually denies him. Although Milton's Jesus is remarkably human, an exclusive focus on this dimension of his character obscures the divine stakes of Jesus’s confrontation with Satan; Jesus emerges victorious, and Satan falls, amazed.
    Show book