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Mile High Service - At His Service #3 - cover

Mile High Service - At His Service #3

Nikka Michaels

Publisher: Bridge City Books

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Summary

In this prequel to Room Service and Lip Service, Dr. Seth Coleman is bored and restless while he waits for his flight to leave. While waiting, he muses on how he met his husband Carson Randall. 
Seth Coleman is a talented surgeon who has the career he’s worked toward his whole life but is still missing something. As he’s standing in an airport store contemplating buying a tie, he meets a handsome stranger, Carson Randall. After sparks fly, they both realize they want the same thing. They want more than just a passing meeting in an airport; they want a relationship.

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