Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Renewal: Queer Sci Fi's Fourth Annual Flash Fiction Contest - QSF Flash Fiction #3 - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

Renewal: Queer Sci Fi's Fourth Annual Flash Fiction Contest - QSF Flash Fiction #3

J. Scott Coatsworth

Publisher: Mischief Corner Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Re.new.al (noun) 
 
1) Resuming an activity after an interruption, or 
2) Extending a contract, subscription or license, or 
3) Replacing or repairing something that is worn out, run-down, or broken, or 
4) Rebirth after death. 
 
Four definitions to spark inspiration, a limitless number of stories to be conceived. Only 110 made the cut. 
 
Thrilling to hopeful, Renewal features 300-word speculative fiction ficlets about sexual and gender minorities to entice readers. 
 
Welcome to Renewal.
Available since: 09/13/2017.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Plover - cover

    The Plover

    Brian Doyle

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Declan O Donnell has sailed out of Oregon and deep into the vast, wild ocean, having had just finally enough of other people and their problems. He will go it alone, he will be his own country, he will be beholden to and beloved of no one. No man is an island, my butt, he thinks. I am that very man... 
    But the galaxy soon presents him with a string of odd, entertaining, and dangerous passengers, who become companions of every sort and stripe. The Plover is the story of their adventures and misadventures in the immense blue country one of their company calls Pacifica. Hounded by a mysterious enemy, reluctantly acquiring one new resident after another, Declan O Donnell's lonely boat is eventually crammed with humor, argument, tension, and a resident herring gull. 
    Brian Doyle's The Plover is a sea novel, a maritime adventure, the story of a cold man melting, a compendium of small miracles, an elegy to Edmund Burke, a watery quest, a battle at sea—and a rapturous, heartfelt celebration of life's surprising paths, planned and unplanned.
    Show book
  • A Christmas Carol (Whispered Edition) - cover

    A Christmas Carol (Whispered...

    Charles Dickens

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In his "Ghostly little book," Charles Dickens invents the modern concept of Christmas Spirit and offers one of the world's most adapted and imitated stories. We know Ebenezer Scrooge, Tiny Tim, and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, not only as fictional characters, but also as icons of the true meaning of Christmas in a world still plagued with avarice and cynicism.
    Show book
  • American Short Story The - Volume 7 - A Chronological History - Volume 7 - cover

    American Short Story The -...

    Ring Lardner, F. Scott...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The American literary tradition has, in a far shorter span of time than others throughout history, achieved a glowing and glittering reputation. 
     
    From its transatlantic roots it has absorbed the sons and daughters of other cultures, other lands and made them part of her own. 
     
    America prides itself on liberty, on justice for all and, if you are a wealthy white man, that is essentially true.  Sadly, many other segments of society find it difficult to feel or become part of this endeavour. 
     
    Within this chronological history of the American short story, that prejudice has helped shape the borders of those two endless questions about any anthology.  Why that story? Why that Author? 
     
    We made some hard choices.  We start with Uriah Derrick Dárcy, an unlikely American name and, to all intents, it appears to be a pseudonym, about whom little is known or can be verified. He leads our literary parade.  From here leviathans appear on a regular basis; Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Twain but also note how many women are here and not just Stowe, Alcott and Chopin.  Women’s status as writers is often neglected or undervalued, predominantly due to their second-class social status throughout much of history but their stories, their angles of approach to writing are both expertly crafted and refreshing.   
     
    Another stain on the social and cultural fabric of American has been that of Race.  Black people were harshly and unfairly treated as a matter of course.  The Civil War may have opened the door but in reality little changed.  The majority of the stories included here written by black authors are disturbing in the wrongs they were accused of, and the burdens they were forced to carry.  This eye-opening literature enables us to once more take stock and applaud and bring some glimmers of recognition to their struggles and their art.  
     
    There are some authors, liberally sprinkled throughout, both male and female who may previously have escaped your attention.  Enjoy them.  Adore them.  Make them part of your everyday reading and listening.  These forgotten voices are fine examples both of their craft, their art, and their take on society as it was then. 
     
    In the period we cover from the late 18th Century, around the time of the American Revolution, up until the catastrophe of World War 2, the printing press was creating a market to share words.  With industrialization and a large swathe of people eager to be distracted from hard working lives, a plethora of magazines and periodicals shot up, all clamoring for works to publish, to share those words, to introduce new ideas and explain how some of us view ourselves and each other.  Some of these authors were only published that way, one story wonders—hitched to the fading star of a disposable periodical.   
     
    And, of course, the elephant in the room was the English.  In its early days US copyright law was non-existent and didn’t recognise anyone else’s.  Publishers were free to take the talents of Dickens or Trollope and freely print it without permission or coin.   Competing against that, gave you a decided disadvantage. 
     
    Within these stories you will also find very occasional examples of historical prejudice.  A few words here and there which in today’s world some may find inappropriate or even offensive.  It is not our intention to make anyone uncomfortable but to show that the world in order to change must reconcile itself to the actual truth rather than put it out of sight.  Context is everything, both to understand and to illuminate the path forward.  The author’s words are set, our reaction to them encourages our change. 
     
    Within this melting pot of styles, genres and wordplay one fact stands out: The American short story Literary tradition has a strong, vibrant and almost inclusive history, if you know where to look.  Which is here
    Show book
  • The Ransom of Red Chief and Others - cover

    The Ransom of Red Chief and Others

    O. Henry

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Four favorite tales from the pen of American short-story writer O. Henry that burst with his humor, pathos, and endearing observations on children, the poor, and dogs! 
    In this collection: “The Ransom of Red Chief” (two kidnappers hatch a plot and get more than they bargain for!), “Memoirs of a Yellow Dog” (a put-upon pup and his master yearn for a better life), “The Cop and the Anthem” (all poor Soapy wanted was a warm bed for the winter), and “The Gift of the Magi” (the classic Christmas tale of love and giving from the heart).
    Show book
  • Witch's Daughter - An Erotic Short Story - cover

    Witch's Daughter - An Erotic...

    Erin Pim

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In this erotic forest fantasy we find ourselves acquainted with Wisteria, a beautiful if somewhat naïve orphan, forced to live with her domineering grandmother - the all-knowing Forest Witch. When our sweet young heroine falls deeply in love with a boy from a nearby village of elves, granny does everything in her power to stop him from taking the young girl’s virginity. With hormones raging, will Wisteria escape the clutches of her wicked guardian? And if so, how will she react to the ecstasy of the sacred rights of hymen?This erotic short story from Erin Pim contains highly sexualised language and graphically descriptive passages of an adult nature. It is therefore intended solely for a mature, open-minded audience.
    Show book
  • Fresh Complaint - Stories - cover

    Fresh Complaint - Stories

    Jeffrey Eugenides

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The first collection of short fiction from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jeffrey Eugenides 
    Jeffrey Eugenides's bestselling novels have shown him to be an astute observer of the crises of adolescence, self-discovery, family love, and what it means to be American in our times.  
    The stories in Fresh Complaint explore equally rich­­—­­and intriguing—territory. Ranging from the bitingly reproductive antics of "Baster" to the dreamy, moving account of a young traveler's search for enlightenment in "Air Mail" (selected by Annie Proulx for Best American Short Stories), this collection presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet a failed poet who, envious of other people's wealth during the real-estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; a clavichordist whose dreams of art founder under the obligations of marriage and fatherhood; and, in "Fresh Complaint," a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her immigrant family lead her to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged British physicist. Narratively compelling, beautifully written, and packed with a density of ideas despite their fluid grace, these stories chart the development and maturation of a major American writer.
    Show book