Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Rain after Midnight - cover

Rain after Midnight

Don Skiles

Publisher: Pelekinesis

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Most of the pieces in Rain After Midnight can be thought of as filmic, as "long story short." The shortness of the form works, like the compression required in a good poem. 

There are four distinct groupings or sets of stories:  One set has to do with film, cinema, movies; a second springs from thinking about writing, what is involved; pieces connected with England make a third grouping; and the fourth is the past, that great well. 

As the French film director Godard said, when a reporter asked him if he thought that a film should have a beginning, middle and end, "Yes. But not necessarily in that order."

Who read this book also read:

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - cover

    The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • 2
    • 15
    • 0
    If you loved the movie The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, then you should read the short story-because apart from the title and the fact that Benjamin ages backwards, they are nothing alike. So it saves you from having to decide whether you prefer the book or the movie. 
     
    In the story version by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Benjamin Button is born an old man who fancies smoking his father's pipe and reading encyclopedias rather than playing with toys. As he gets younger he reaches the right age to start working, then to go to college, then to fight in the war. Finally, when he's grown (emm, shrunk) to a baby, Benjamin enjoys playing with children's toys. In the book version you don't get to see Brad Pitt, but you do get to enjoy some fantastic Jazz Age prose from the master Fitzgerald.
    Show book
  • The Business of Naming Things - cover

    The Business of Naming Things

    Michael Coffey

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Riveting . . . vibrant and unsparing.” —Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)“Superb. . . . Startlingly original.” —Library Journal (starred review)“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —JAY PARINI, author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station“Sherwood Anderson would recognize this world of lonely, longing characters, whose surface lives Coffey tenderly plumbs. These beautiful stories—spare, rich, wise and compelling—go to the heart.” —FREDERIC TUTEN, author of Self Portraits: Fictions and Tintin in the New World“Whether [Coffey is] writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and the perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?”  —EDMUND WHITE, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own StoryAmong these eight stories, a fan of writer (and fellow adoptee) Harold Brodkey gains an audience with him at his life’s end, two pals take a Joycean sojourn, a man whose business is naming things meets a woman who may not be what she seems, and a father discovers his son is a suspect in an assassination attempt on the president. In each tale, Michael Coffey’s exquisite attention to character underlies the brutally honest perspectives of his disenchanted fathers, damaged sons, and orphans left feeling perpetually disconnected.Michael Coffey is the author of three books of poems and 27 Men Out, a book about baseball’s perfect games. He also co-edited The Irish in America, a book about Irish immigration to America, which was a companion volume to a PBS documentary series. He divides his time between Manhattan and Bolton Landing, New York. The Business of Naming Things is his first work of fiction.
    Show book
  • The Giraffe Problem - cover

    The Giraffe Problem

    Barry Pain

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Barry Pain (1864-1928) was an English journalist, poet, and writer, best known as a writer of parody and lightly humorous stories.The Giraffe Problem tells the story of an evening at the Problem Club, a secret society of gentlemen in London who meet once a month in a private room above a restaurant, where one of the waiters is the admirable Leonard. Every month Leonard sets the members a problem or challenge. The one who is able to complete the feat successfully wins that month's share of the membership fees.In this tale, Leonard's challenge involves inducing an unwitting woman spontaneously to utter the words: "You ought to have been a giraffe". Which of the gentlemen will be able to do this...and in what circumstances?
    Show book
  • Problem at Sea - A Hercule Poirot Story - cover

    Problem at Sea - A Hercule...

    Agatha Christie

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Previously published in the print anthology Poirot's Early Cases. 
    On a ship bound for Egypt, a woman is found stabbed to death in her cabin. Unfortunately for the murderer, Hercule Poirot is on board.
    Show book
  • Hot as Ice - cover

    Hot as Ice

    Dahlia Rose

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Kryslyn Dale’s passion was exploring the world and her dream trip finally came to pass. She would traverse the Frostisen Glacier in Norway.  The people of Narvik warned her about being out in the wilderness and away from town alone. But as Kryslyn stared up at the Aurora Borealis, there was nowhere she would rather be.  The sound of breaking trees and the vibration of the earth woke her and as she scrambled out of her tent expecting to see part of the glacier breaking away. Instead she was face to face with a frost blue dragon. The beast of myth took her in its claws and her scream was lost in the wind.  Another surprise came in the dragon’s lair when the mystical creature morphed into a man unabashedly and gloriously naked. 
    Torbjorn Kristoffer thought she was sent to hunt him but soon he figured out she wasn’t a threat. There was no way she was leaving this adventure of a lifetime, seeing the world through a dragon’s eyes. Never one to doubt her instincts, Krysyln gave into temptation and with only four weeks in Norway, she planned to leave with memories of being in the arms of the man who changed into a beast of legend. The desire he created as they found kismet with each other would be put in jeopardy when Tor’s true enemy surfaced. Kryslyn was caught between a force of nature and the madman who wanted the ultimate prize, the last ice dragon. Tor claimed her as his mate and vowed to protect her. Kryslyn would see the glacier melt into the sea before she would let her dragon be caged. In the end she may end up being his only salvation.
    Show book
  • The Philosopher's Stone - cover

    The Philosopher's Stone

    Philipp Schönthaler

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Philosopher's Stone assembles various narrative stands into a cohesive and thought-provoking tale of our times. The trenchant criticism of continuous self-optimization and esoteric ideology are astonishingly subtle and reward repeated reading.
    From Philipp Schönthaler following ist published at Matthes & Seitz Berlin: »Vor Anbruch der Morgenröte", »Portrait des Managers als junger Autor", »Nach oben ist das Leben offen", »Ein Schiff das singend zieht auf seiner Bahn".
    Show book