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Origins of Chinese Festivals (Rev) - cover

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Origins of Chinese Festivals (Rev)

Goh Pei Ki

Publisher: Asiapac Books Pte Ltd

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Summary

This book on the origins of the festivals and popular stories associated with them will help the reader to appreciate how the celebration of these festivals acted as a social glue in identifying and helping the Chinese stick together as a race throughout their long history and wherever they are found.

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