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Origins of Chinese Cuisine - cover

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Origins of Chinese Cuisine

Xu Shitao

Publisher: Asiapac Books Pte Ltd

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Summary

Origins of Chinese Cuisine showcases some of the most famous and best-relished dishes. 
 
Here you will learn about: 
 
* Unique characteristics of each regional cuisine 
 
* Fascinating stories behind these selected dishes 
 
* Their development into their present-day form 
 
* Some of the lavish and singular banquet styles

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